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Sue Trainor: News

Prince George's County PD - March 16, 2017

Hello PG Friends!!

It was lovely to work with you yesterday. Here are the "Very Hungry Caterpillar" songs you were asking about.

Scroll down to find more repertoire from other workshops, too. Hope we get to work together again!

 

THE VERY HUNGRY CATERPILLAR
Song Adaptations by Sue Trainor

To the tune of "Jingle Bells:"
Chorus:

            Caterpillar, caterpillar

            Hungry all the time

            Eat and grow and eat and grow

            Until it’s chrysalis time

Verse:

            Monday he ate a ____

            Tuesday he ate two ____

           Wednesday day he ate three _____

            And he was feeling great

           Thursday he ate four ____

           Friday he ate five _____

           Saturday he ate _____

           And got a tummyache!

           

To the tune of “Green Grass Grows All Around”


In the garden    there was a leaf

The prettiest leaf     that you ever did see

Leaf in the garden and

The life cycle goes around and around

The life cycle goes around.



And on that leaf    there was an egg

The prettiest egg     that you ever did see

Egg on the leaf and the leaf in the garden and

The life cycle goes around and around

The life cycle goes around.

 

And in that egg   there was a caterpillar

The prettiest caterpillar     that you ever did see

Caterpillar in the egg and the

Egg on the leaf and the

Leaf in the garden and

The life cycle goes around and around

The life cycle goes around.



And on that caterpillar, there is a chrysalis

The prettiest chrysalis  that you ever did see

Chrysalis on the caterpillar and the

Caterpillar in the egg and the

Egg on the leaf and the

Leaf in the garden and

The life cycle goes around and around

The life cycle goes around.

 

And in the crysallis   there is a butterfly

The prettiest butterfly   that you ever did see

Butterfly in the chrysalis

Chrysalis on the caterpillar and the

Caterpillar in the egg and the

Egg on the leaf and the

Leaf in the garden and

The life cycle goes around and around

The life cycle goes around.

 

And in that butterfly    there is an egg

The prettiest egg    that you ever did see

Egg in the butterfly  and the

Butterfly in the chrysalis

Chrysalis on the caterpillar and the

Caterpillar in the egg and the

Egg on the leaf and the

Leaf in the garden and

The life cycle goes around and around

The life cycle goes around.

 

And what do you think happened to the egg in the butterfly?

 
 

 

James Ryder Randall Elementary School - December 21, 2016

Hello Friends!

Thanks for joining me to explore Great Musical Adaptations this morning.

The strategies we added to the usual repertoire can best be revisited at the Wolf Trap website: education.wolftrap.org. (Remember DON'T put "www" in front, because you won't get to the site if you do.)

Here are the strategies you're looking for at the Wolf Trap website:

1. I Have a Box: Exploring Setting and Characterization
In this experience, Wolf Trap Teaching Artist Katherine Lyons demonstrates using gestures to represent real objects and introduce characters of a story.

2. Imaginary Travel
In this experience, Wolf Trap Teaching Artists Valerie Bayne Carroll and Michele Valeri demonstrate how to travel into a story and experience it on a new level using pictures, sound effects, and music.

Best wishes for the holidays!

Sue

Child Care Aware of ND - October 15, 2016

Hello, North Dakota Friends! Thanks so much for a great session today! Here are the lyrics and procedures for song strategies that I shared with you this morning. Let me also encourage you to visit education.wolftrap.org. They will ask you to create a sign-in, but it's free, and you'll get short video clips of Wolf Trap artists demonstrating strategies in music, drama, dance and puppetry, with lesson plans included. Hope all this is useful for you - please stay in touch!

Best regards, Sue

 

Thumb Piano     

(descending scale)

Time to sing, time sing

All my friends it’s

(rising scale) time to sing



Give Me the Beat

Chant by Yvette Holt

1.     Set up: Leader taps knees in steady beat.  Everyone taps knees in steady beat.

2.     Leader chants:

Give me the beat, beat, beat

Give me the beat, beat, beat

Give me the beat, give me the beat

Give me the beat, beat, beat

 

3.     Repeat; everyone joins the chant

4.     Change motion to clapping hands. Everyone chants.

Clap your hands, hands, hands

Clap your hands, hands, hands

Clap your hands, clap your hands

Clap your hands, hands, hands

 

5.     Change motion to tapping the head. Everyone chants.

Touch your head, head, head

Touch your head, head, head

Touch your head, touch your head

Touch your head, head, head

 

6. Use other parts of the body.

 

How could we adapt this to use senses more?

Visual: Leader’s model, icons of possible choices, leader chair icon, photos of students to choose from in picking next leader

Aural: Chant, leader’s cues and spoken choices (use children’s devices as appropriate)

Movement: Beat movement, change from sitting to standing position, change to bigger movements (jump, twist, punch, stomp), move through space (walk, tiptoe, gallop)

Tactile: Feeling of the beat, teddy bear (to designate the leader), everyone has a doll or a stuffed animal to keep the beat on

Imagination: Pat the baby, rock the baby, bounce the baby, jump the baby

TODAY’S EXTENSION: Create instruments with empty plastic apple juice bottles and something to use as mallets. Notice that the bottle will make a low sound or a high sound, depending on where you hit it.

Tap it low low low

Tap it low low low

Tap it low, tap it low

Tap it low, low low

(repeat for high)



Contrast with loud and quiet:

Tap it loud loud loud….

Tap it quiet quiet quiet….



 

Slide Whistle

Sequence by Sue Trainor

 

Procedure:

1.  Leader demonstrates the slide whistle.

 

2. Everyone pretends to play a slide whistle. Pretend to hold the whistle and imitate the sound of the slide whistle vocally. (Discuss why the slide whistle is an instrument we can’t share.)

 

3. Everyone imitates the sound of the slide whistle and shows the high and low movement with their hands  Play low to high pitch, until everyone makes the connection between the vocal and physical representations.

 

4.  Play high to low; everyone imitates the sound vocally and shows the movement of the sound with their hands.

 

5. Play a sound; ask children if it is low or high. Ask them to show you with their hands and sing the answer in their voices. Repeat, alternating high and low.

 

6. Follow the sound with other parts of the body (not vocally). Elbows, head, feet, whole body, etc. Stop moving when the sound stops. Move quickly when the pitch changes quickly and slowly when the pitch changes slowly.

 

How can we adapt this to use senses more?

Visual: We see the manipulation of the whistle, we see how others move.  Other visuals. Leader should model the movements at first, but then stop so children have to move from listening and not from watching. Take a video of children so they can see themselves moving. Move in front of a mirror. Play with mirror movement: children face each other and move together to the whistle sound.

Aural: The sound of the slide whistle (or our voices) is the focus. NOTE: if children have sound sensitivity, this strategy should be used with a mellower, metal whistle rather than a plastic one.

Movement: Move to the sound of the whistle. Use a variety of body parts: hand, elbow, head, shoulder, knee, foot, whole body. Use the whistle to walk through general space: toot the whistle in steady beat as children take one step for each toot. If the pitch changes, children crouch as they walk or walk taller.

Tactile: Move an object to the sound of the whistle.

Imagination: Use slide whistle as accompaniment to movement in a role play.

 

Hand-Hand Chant

By Sue Trainor

 

As the leader chants, voice pitch should climb higher and higher, then slide slowly from high to low on “down.”

 

Hand, hand

Reach, reach

Up, up, up, up

Down!

 

How could we adapt this to use senses more?

Because this is a simple strategy, designed for developmentally young children, I recommend keeping it just this simple. Use hand over hand support as needed.

 

Have You Got Your Spot

By Sue Trainor, based on Ella Jenkins "Did You Feed My Cow"

 

1.  Everyone is sitting on a designated spot. Leader calls; children respond.

Call: Can you sit on your spot ?   Response: Yes I can!

Call: Can you sit on your spot ?   Response: Yes I can!

Call: What are you doing?          Response: Sitting on the spot

Call: What are you doing?          Response: Sitting on the spot

 

Call: Can you clap on your spot ?   Response: Yes I can!  (clap in steady beat)

Call: Can you clap on your spot ?   Response: Yes I can!  (clap in steady beat)

Call: What are you doing?          Response: Clapping on the spot

Call: What are you doing?          Response: Clapping on the spot

 

2. Try another sitting motion or two. If everyone is holding their spot, try standing.

Call: Can you stand on your spot ?   Response: Yes I can!  (etc.)

 

3.  Call: Can you jump on your spot?   Response: Yes I can!  (etc.)

4. Ask for children’s suggestions for movement and substitute those actions into the chant.

5. End with:  Call: “Can You Sit on Your Spot”   Response: Yes I can!  (etc.)

 

How could we adapt this to use senses more?

Visual: Leader’s model, could use picture icons as appropriate for leader to choose the next movement. Another visual component of this is judging one’s own self-space. Can I see that I am in my place?

Aural: Chant.

Movement: Movement in self-space as described. Movement also can be extended to other positional concepts – stand in front, beside, behind, next to, under… Spots could be self-space in the context of a larger game  – like musical chairs

Tactile: Can use spots with a prop or stuffed animal. Is the monkey on the spot? Clean-up – I often ask children to put the spot on some part of their body (head, shoulder, elbow…) and pick up the spots from there.

Imagination: Spots could be self-space in a storytelling sequence; for example, as the character’s “house” or safe space.

 

Here’s What I Learned Chant

By Sue Trainor

Here’s what I learned, oh yeah

Here’s what I learned, oh yeah

Here’s what I learned in our lesson today

Here’s what I learned, oh yeah

Here’s what I learned, oh yeah

Here’s what I learned in our lesson today

 

How could we adapt this to use senses more?

Aural: Chant

Visual: Leader motions, icons for lesson concepts or segments

Movement: Create movements to go with it. I roll my arms and tap my knees

Tactile: Feel of the beat

Imagination: Recall of what we’ve done

 

 

Shake Those Eggs

By Val Carroll

1.     Transition: Hand one egg to each child, singing a transition song  such as (to “Skip to My Lou”) – “Here’s an egg for you and you, here’s an egg for you and you….”

 

2.     Slowly sing the song and model the motions described. Give children time to imitate.  Note the “C*” means C above middle C.

 

G          G          E     E      G       G         C*

Shake those eggs and shake them high

 

 F          F         F         F     A       G        D

Shake those eggs and shake them low

 

G          G          E     E      G       G        C*

Shake those eggs and shake them high

 

D            F     E            D    C        E   C   

Round and round and round we go

 

(same melody)

Shake and shake and shake and stop (3x)

Then we’ll shake and shake some more

 

How could we adapt this to use senses more?

Visual: We see the leader’s model, we could use a song icon

Aural: The song, the sound of the shakers

Movement: Moving with the shakers. We could add other movements and spatial directions. (also, see tactile)

Tactile: The feeling of the shaker and the sensation of the movement inside the shaker. Could substitute other instruments (tap that drum and tap it fast, tap that drum and tap it slow….) or things like scarves.

Imagination: Could be adapted into storytelling. We could be retelling “Giraffes Can’t Dance,” for example:

Giraffes in the circle now, dance up high

Giraffes in the circle now, dance down low

Giraffes in the circle now, dance up high

Now round and round and round you go

Dance and dance and dance and stop (3x)

Then the giraffes can sit back down.

 

Walking Through the Forest

 

 C     C     C    D    E  G   D   G   E   C

Walking through the forest, forest, forest

C    C     C      D   E  G

Walking through the forest

D      D  G  C

What do I see?

(chant) Sh sh sh, I think I see a ____  (Make sound effect and/or motion)

D     G  G   C

Come follow me!

 

How could we adapt this to use senses more?

Visual: Show a picture of a forest, show pictures of things we see in the forest, animal props

Aural:  song, animal sounds, recorded forest sounds

Movement: walk around the room

Tactile: Use animal props, costumes, toy cameras or binoculars

Imagination:  Imagine that we have on hiking outfits; imagine we have cameras or binoculars; imagine that some children are (in the role of) animals

 

Adaptation: This song can be adapted for any purpose involving moving through general space.

-Walking through the park, the hallway, to the bathroom, etc.

-Swimming through the ocean

-Walking to the market / walking to our seats

 

Funky Duck Chant

By Sue Trainor

 

I’m Funky Duck, hey hey

I’m Funky Duck, hey hey

I want to know

Can you find my ___ today

 

How could we adapt this to use senses more?

Visual:  Puppet duck (or other animal) to which Velcro will stick. The puppet is the visual to draw children’s attention to learning content, such as colors, shapes, letters. numbers, etc.

Aural:  the chant

Movement: Because children are being asked to focus on an object, movement is not part of this strategy, aside from the puppet moving from child to child.

Tactile: the child is asked to take a picture or shape from the duck and replace it.

Imagination: when children have learned the strategy, they can take the role of Funky Duck and take leadership with the puppet.

 

 

 

I HAVE A BOX

Adapted from Katherine Lyons’ version

 

Dramatically, chant:

 

I have a box

The box has a top

Let’s oooooopen it    (open the box slowly and dramatically, pitch rising on “ooopen”

And STOP! (loudly close the box)

 

I have a box

The box has a top

Let’s oooooopen it

And see what we’ve got



AWA ATU
also traditional from Ghana
The trick to this one is remembering that there are FOUR beats (not just 3).
Motion for Awa: Wave both hands wide, Motion for Atu: Cross harms and tap shouders
 
Awa, awa, awa  (D G, D G, D G)
Atu atu atu   (A B, A B, A B)
Awa-aa-aa-aa   (BCA A-A-A)
Atu-uu-uu-uu   (ABG G-G-G)

 

Arlington 8/31/16 - August 31, 2016

Hello, Friends! Great session this morning! Thanks so much for all your energy and participation (and patience with that small, crowded room!). Here are the strategies from our workshop today. Please stay in touch and let me know how things go for you, and if you have any questions as you try things out, I'm happy to continue the conversation. And don't forget to go to education.wolftrap.org for video demonstrations and so many more ideas! Best wishes for an awesome year!

Give Me the Beat

Chant by Yvette Holt

1.     Set up: Leader taps knees in steady beat.  Everyone taps knees in steady beat.

2.     Leader chants:

Give me the beat, beat, beat

Give me the beat, beat, beat

Give me the beat, give me the beat

Give me the beat, beat, beat

 

3.     Repeat; everyone joins the chant

4.     Change motion to clapping hands. Everyone chants.

Clap your hands, hands, hands

Clap your hands, hands, hands

Clap your hands, clap your hands

Clap your hands, hands, hands

 

5.     Change motion to tapping the head. Everyone chants.

Touch your head, head, head

Touch your head, head, head

Touch your head, touch your head

Touch your head, head, head

 

6. Use other parts of the body.

 

How could we adapt this to use senses more?

Visual: Leader’s model, icons of possible choices, leader chair icon, photos of students to choose from in picking next leader

Aural: Chant, leader’s cues and spoken choices (use children’s devices as appropriate)

Movement: Beat movement, change from sitting to standing position, change to bigger movements (jump, twist, punch, stomp), move through space (walk, tiptoe, gallop)

Tactile: Feeling of the beat, teddy bear (to designate the leader), everyone has a doll or a stuffed animal to keep the beat on

Imagination: Pat the baby, rock the baby, bounce the baby, jump the baby



 BEAR CHAIR

Applied to  “Give Me the Beat”

 

Show toy teddy bear. “This is my friend, Bear. This is the Bear Chair.” Attach photo of the bear to a chair in the front of the room. “Whoever has Bear is the leader and gets to sit in the Bear Chair.”

 

Model first, then pass the bear to individual children. Offer children a choice of body parts to tap; use pictoral icons as appropriate.

 

Slide Whistle

Sequence by Sue Trainor

 

Procedure:

1.  Leader demonstrates the slide whistle.

 

2. Everyone pretends to play a slide whistle. Pretend to hold the whistle and imitate the sound of the slide whistle vocally. (Discuss why the slide whistle is an instrument we can’t share.)

 

3. Everyone imitates the sound of the slide whistle and shows the high and low movement with their hands  Play low to high pitch, until everyone makes the connection between the vocal and physical representations.

 

4.  Play high to low; everyone imitates the sound vocally and shows the movement of the sound with their hands.

 

5. Play a sound; ask children if it is low or high. Ask them to show you with their hands and sing the answer in their voices. Repeat, alternating high and low.

 

6. Follow the sound with other parts of the body (not vocally). Elbows, head, feet, whole body, etc. Stop moving when the sound stops. Move quickly when the pitch changes quickly and slowly when the pitch changes slowly.

 

How can we adapt this to use senses more?

Visual: We see the manipulation of the whistle, we see how others move.  Other visuals. Leader should model the movements at first, but then stop so children have to move from listening and not from watching. Take a video of children so they can see themselves moving. Move in front of a mirror. Play with mirror movement: children face each other and move together to the whistle sound.

Aural: The sound of the slide whistle (or our voices) is the focus. NOTE: if children have sound sensitivity, this strategy should be used with a mellower, metal whistle rather than a plastic one.

Movement: Move to the sound of the whistle. Use a variety of body parts: hand, elbow, head, shoulder, knee, foot, whole body. Use the whistle to walk through general space: toot the whistle in steady beat as children take one step for each toot. If the pitch changes, children crouch as they walk or walk taller.

Tactile: Move an object to the sound of the whistle.

Imagination: Use slide whistle as accompaniment to movement in a role play.

 

Can You Sit On Your Spot

By Sue Trainor

 

1.  Everyone is sitting on a designated spot. Leader calls; children respond.

Call: Can you sit on your spot ?   Response: Yes I can!

Call: Can you sit on your spot ?   Response: Yes I can!

Call: What are you doing?          Response: Sitting on the spot

Call: What are you doing?          Response: Sitting on the spot

 

Call: Can you clap on your spot ?   Response: Yes I can!  (clap in steady beat)

Call: Can you clap on your spot ?   Response: Yes I can!  (clap in steady beat)

Call: What are you doing?          Response: Clapping on the spot

Call: What are you doing?          Response: Clapping on the spot

 

2. Try another sitting motion or two. If everyone is holding their spot, try standing.

Call: Can you stand on your spot ?   Response: Yes I can!  (etc.)

 

3.  Call: Can you jump on your spot?   Response: Yes I can!  (etc.)

4. Ask for children’s suggestions for movement and substitute those actions into the chant.

5. End with:  Call: “Can You Sit on Your Spot”   Response: Yes I can!  (etc.)

 

How could we adapt this to use senses more?

Visual: Leader’s model, could use picture icons as appropriate for leader to choose the next movement. Another visual component of this is judging one’s own self-space. Can I see that I am in my place?

Aural: Chant.

Movement: Movement in self-space as described. Movement also can be extended to other positional concepts – stand in front, beside, behind, next to, under… Spots could be self-space in the context of a larger game  – like musical chairs

Tactile: Can use spots with a prop or stuffed animal. Is the monkey on the spot? Clean-up – I often ask children to put the spot on some part of their body (head, shoulder, elbow…) and pick up the spots from there.

Imagination: Spots could be self-space in a storytelling sequence; for example, as the character’s “house” or safe space.

 

Walking Through the Forest

 

 C     C     C    D    E  G   D   G   E   C

Walking through the forest, forest, forest

C    C     C      D   E  G

Walking through the forest

D      D  G  C

What do I see?

(chant) Sh sh sh, I think I see a ____  (Make sound effect and/or motion)

D     G  G   C

Come follow me!

 

How could we adapt this to use senses more?

Visual: Show a picture of a forest, show pictures of things we see in the forest, animal props

Aural:  song, animal sounds, recorded forest sounds

Movement: walk around the room

Tactile: Use animal props, costumes, toy cameras or binoculars

Imagination:  Imagine that we have on hiking outfits; imagine we have cameras or binoculars; imagine that some children are (in the role of) animals

 

Adaptation: This song can be adapted for any purpose involving moving through general space.

-Walking through the park, the hallway, to the bathroom, etc.

-Swimming through the ocean

-Walking to the market / walking to our seats

 

 

Funky Duck Chant

By Sue Trainor

 

I’m Funky Duck, hey hey

I’m Funky Duck, hey hey

I want to know

Can you find my ___ today

 

How could we adapt this to use senses more?

Visual:  Puppet duck (or other animal) to which Velcro will stick. The puppet is the visual to draw children’s attention to learning content, such as colors, shapes, letters. numbers, etc.

Aural:  the chant

Movement: Because children are being asked to focus on an object, movement is not part of this strategy, aside from the puppet moving from child to child.

Tactile: the child is asked to take a picture or shape from the duck and replace it.

Imagination: when children have learned the strategy, they can take the role of Funky Duck and take leadership with the puppet.


I Have a Box

Adapted from Katherine Lyons, WT Master Teaching Artist

Chant, in steady beat:

I have a box,

The box has a top

Let’s oooooooopen it

And    STOP!     (Shut the box quickly, with a bang or more gently)

After several repetitions:

 Let’s oooooopen it    (voice slides from down to up pitch)

 And see what we’ve got!


 

When the activity that emerges from the box is complete and props are returned to the box:

 Let’s clooooooooose it (voice slides from up to down pitch)

And stop.



Imagination Box: Use your fist for the box. Take the box from behind your back and use your other hand as the top.   

After doing the opening ritual, say:

“I see a ____ moving about”

Let’s reach inside and take the ____ out.”

Note that you can take out whatever you choose; one example is taking out only the lion’s voice, and shutting the box to end the sound.



Imaginary Journey (drama strategy):  Carry your imaginary backpack on your journey! What goes inside? Draw an imaginary refrigerator and open it to find drinks and snacks. Maybe you have binoculars under your chair, and sunglasses in your pocket. As you take the journey, don’t forget to use what you’ve brought. Stop and role play the snack time, using the binoculars, etc.



 AWA

Traditional, from Ghana. Awa means ‘I’m glad we have this time together’ and Atu means ‘hug’.

 

Awa, awa, awa  (D G, D G, D G)

Atu atu atu   (A B, A B, A B)

Awa-aa-aa-aa   (BCA A-A-A)

Atu-uu-uu-uu   (ABG G-G-G)

Prince George's County Early Childhood Teachers - August 24, 2016

Hello, Friends!

I had so much fun working with you all today! Thank you so much for your generosity with your energy and ideas. Here is our repertoire from today. Please stay in touch and let me know if I can be helpful as you experiment with these strategies. Also, let me encourage you to sign up at Wolf Trap's website - you'll find excellent short videos and lesson plans that will add even more to your tool box. Go to education.wolftrap.org. (I think I put .com on my poster - that was a mistake!) 

 

Give Me the Beat

Chant by Yvette Holt

1.     Set up: Leader taps knees in steady beat.  Everyone taps knees in steady beat.

2.     Leader chants:

Give me the beat, beat, beat

Give me the beat, beat, beat

Give me the beat, give me the beat

Give me the beat, beat, beat

 

3.     Repeat; everyone joins the chant

4.     Change motion to clapping hands. Everyone chants.

Clap your hands, hands, hands

Clap your hands, hands, hands

Clap your hands, clap your hands

Clap your hands, hands, hands

 

5.     Change motion to tapping the head. Everyone chants.

Touch your head, head, head

Touch your head, head, head

Touch your head, touch your head

Touch your head, head, head

 

6. Use other parts of the body.

 

How could we adapt this to use senses more?

Visual: Leader’s model, icons of possible choices, leader chair icon, photos of students to choose from in picking next leader

Aural: Chant, leader’s cues and spoken choices (use children’s devices as appropriate)

Movement: Beat movement, change from sitting to standing position, change to bigger movements (jump, twist, punch, stomp), move through space (walk, tiptoe, gallop)

Tactile: Feeling of the beat, teddy bear (to designate the leader), everyone has a doll or a stuffed animal to keep the beat on

Imagination: Pat the baby, rock the baby, bounce the baby, jump the baby



 BEAR CHAIR

Applied to  “Give Me the Beat”

 

Show toy teddy bear. “This is my friend, Bear. This is the Bear Chair.” Attach photo of the bear to a chair in the front of the room. “Whoever has Bear is the leader and gets to sit in the Bear Chair.”

 

Model first, then pass the bear to individual children. Offer children a choice of body parts to tap; use pictoral icons as appropriate.

 

Slide Whistle

Sequence by Sue Trainor

 

Procedure:

1.  Leader demonstrates the slide whistle.

 

2. Everyone pretends to play a slide whistle. Pretend to hold the whistle and imitate the sound of the slide whistle vocally. (Discuss why the slide whistle is an instrument we can’t share.)

 

3. Everyone imitates the sound of the slide whistle and shows the high and low movement with their hands  Play low to high pitch, until everyone makes the connection between the vocal and physical representations.

 

4.  Play high to low; everyone imitates the sound vocally and shows the movement of the sound with their hands.

 

5. Play a sound; ask children if it is low or high. Ask them to show you with their hands and sing the answer in their voices. Repeat, alternating high and low.

 

6. Follow the sound with other parts of the body (not vocally). Elbows, head, feet, whole body, etc. Stop moving when the sound stops. Move quickly when the pitch changes quickly and slowly when the pitch changes slowly.

 

How can we adapt this to use senses more?

Visual: We see the manipulation of the whistle, we see how others move.  Other visuals. Leader should model the movements at first, but then stop so children have to move from listening and not from watching. Take a video of children so they can see themselves moving. Move in front of a mirror. Play with mirror movement: children face each other and move together to the whistle sound.

Aural: The sound of the slide whistle (or our voices) is the focus. NOTE: if children have sound sensitivity, this strategy should be used with a mellower, metal whistle rather than a plastic one.

Movement: Move to the sound of the whistle. Use a variety of body parts: hand, elbow, head, shoulder, knee, foot, whole body. Use the whistle to walk through general space: toot the whistle in steady beat as children take one step for each toot. If the pitch changes, children crouch as they walk or walk taller.

Tactile: Move an object to the sound of the whistle.

Imagination: Use slide whistle as accompaniment to movement in a role play.

 

Hand-Hand Chant

By Sue Trainor

 

As the leader chants, voice pitch should climb higher and higher, then slide slowly from high to low on “down.”

 

Hand, hand

Reach, reach

Up, up, up, up

Down!

 

How could we adapt this to use senses more?

Because this is a simple strategy, designed for developmentally young children, I recommend keeping it just this simple. Use hand over hand support as needed.

 

Can You Sit On Your Spot

By Sue Trainor

 

1.  Everyone is sitting on a designated spot. Leader calls; children respond.

Call: Can you sit on your spot ?   Response: Yes I can!

Call: Can you sit on your spot ?   Response: Yes I can!

Call: What are you doing?          Response: Sitting on the spot

Call: What are you doing?          Response: Sitting on the spot

 

Call: Can you clap on your spot ?   Response: Yes I can!  (clap in steady beat)

Call: Can you clap on your spot ?   Response: Yes I can!  (clap in steady beat)

Call: What are you doing?          Response: Clapping on the spot

Call: What are you doing?          Response: Clapping on the spot

 

2. Try another sitting motion or two. If everyone is holding their spot, try standing.

Call: Can you stand on your spot ?   Response: Yes I can!  (etc.)

 

3.  Call: Can you jump on your spot?   Response: Yes I can!  (etc.)

4. Ask for children’s suggestions for movement and substitute those actions into the chant.

5. End with:  Call: “Can You Sit on Your Spot”   Response: Yes I can!  (etc.)

 

How could we adapt this to use senses more?

Visual: Leader’s model, could use picture icons as appropriate for leader to choose the next movement. Another visual component of this is judging one’s own self-space. Can I see that I am in my place?

Aural: Chant.

Movement: Movement in self-space as described. Movement also can be extended to other positional concepts – stand in front, beside, behind, next to, under… Spots could be self-space in the context of a larger game  – like musical chairs

Tactile: Can use spots with a prop or stuffed animal. Is the monkey on the spot? Clean-up – I often ask children to put the spot on some part of their body (head, shoulder, elbow…) and pick up the spots from there.

Imagination: Spots could be self-space in a storytelling sequence; for example, as the character’s “house” or safe space.

 Making a Circle with children  who are sitting in rows or just grouped:

1.     Can you stand on your spot…

2.     Can you pick up your spot…

3.     To the tune of “Shortnin’ Bread”

Let’s make a circle circle circle

Let’s make a circle just like this

Let’s make a circle circle circle

Let’s make a circle just like this

                  (Instruct children to take one or two steps back to enlarge the circle)

                  Spots up high, spots down low

                  Spots on the floor, here we go

4.     Can you sit on your spot….



Here’s What I Learned Chant

By Sue Trainor

Here’s what I learned, oh yeah

Here’s what I learned, oh yeah

Here’s what I learned in our lesson today

Here’s what I learned, oh yeah

Here’s what I learned, oh yeah

Here’s what I learned in our lesson today

 

How could we adapt this to use senses more?

Aural: Chant

Visual: Leader motions, icons for lesson concepts or segments

Movement: Create movements to go with it. I roll my arms and tap my knees

Tactile: Feel of the beat

Imagination: Recall of what we’ve done

 

 

Shake Those Eggs

By Val Carroll

1.     Transition: Hand one egg to each child, singing a transition song  such as (to “Skip to My Lou”) – “Here’s an egg for you and you, here’s an egg for you and you….”

 

2.     Slowly sing the song and model the motions described. Give children time to imitate.  Note the “C*” means C above middle C.

 

G          G          E     E      G       G         C*

Shake those eggs and shake them high

 

 F          F         F         F     A       G        D

Shake those eggs and shake them low

 

G          G          E     E      G       G        C*

Shake those eggs and shake them high

 

D            F     E            D    C        E   C   

Round and round and round we go

 

(same melody)

Shake and shake and shake and stop (3x)

Then we’ll shake and shake some more

 

How could we adapt this to use senses more?

Visual: We see the leader’s model, we could use a song icon

Aural: The song, the sound of the shakers

Movement: Moving with the shakers. We could add other movements and spatial directions. (also, see tactile)

Tactile: The feeling of the shaker and the sensation of the movement inside the shaker. Could substitute other instruments (tap that drum and tap it fast, tap that drum and tap it slow….) or things like scarves.

Imagination: Could be adapted into storytelling. We could be retelling “Giraffes Can’t Dance,” for example:

Giraffes in the circle now, dance up high

Giraffes in the circle now, dance down low

Giraffes in the circle now, dance up high

Now round and round and round you go

Dance and dance and dance and stop (3x)

Then the giraffes can sit back down.

 

Walking Through the Forest

 

 C     C     C    D    E  G   D   G   E   C

Walking through the forest, forest, forest

C    C     C      D   E  G

Walking through the forest

D      D  G  C

What do I see?

(chant) Sh sh sh, I think I see a ____  (Make sound effect and/or motion)

D     G  G   C

Come follow me!

 

How could we adapt this to use senses more?

Visual: Show a picture of a forest, show pictures of things we see in the forest, animal props

Aural:  song, animal sounds, recorded forest sounds

Movement: walk around the room

Tactile: Use animal props, costumes, toy cameras or binoculars

Imagination:  Imagine that we have on hiking outfits; imagine we have cameras or binoculars; imagine that some children are (in the role of) animals

 

Adaptation: This song can be adapted for any purpose involving moving through general space.

-Walking through the park, the hallway, to the bathroom, etc.

-Swimming through the ocean

-Walking to the market / walking to our seats

 

 

Funky Duck Chant

By Sue Trainor

 

I’m Funky Duck, hey hey

I’m Funky Duck, hey hey

I want to know

Can you find my ___ today

 

How could we adapt this to use senses more?

Visual:  Puppet duck (or other animal) to which Velcro will stick. The puppet is the visual to draw children’s attention to learning content, such as colors, shapes, letters. numbers, etc.

Aural:  the chant

Movement: Because children are being asked to focus on an object, movement is not part of this strategy, aside from the puppet moving from child to child.

Tactile: the child is asked to take a picture or shape from the duck and replace it.

Imagination: when children have learned the strategy, they can take the role of Funky Duck and take leadership with the puppet.

I Have a Box

Adapted from Katherine Lyons, WT Master Teaching Artist

Chant, in steady beat:

I have a box,

The box has a top

Let’s oooooooopen it

And    STOP!     (Shut the box quickly, with a bang or more gently)

After several repetitions:

 Let’s oooooopen it    (voice slides from down to up pitch)

 And see what we’ve got!


 

When the activity that emerges from the box is complete and props are returned to the box:

 Let’s clooooooooose it (voice slides from up to down pitch)

And stop.

 

 AWA

Traditional, from Ghana. Awa means ‘I’m glad we have this time together’ and Atu means ‘hug’.

 

Awa, awa, awa  (D G, D G, D G)

Atu atu atu   (A B, A B, A B)

Awa-aa-aa-aa   (BCA A-A-A)

Atu-uu-uu-uu   (ABG G-G-G)

NJPAC - March 16, 2016

Hello, Friends!

Thanks so much for your active participation and sharing your thoughts this afternoon! We all benefit when these workshops are conversations.

Here is our repertoire. Please stay in touch and let me know how these ideas are working for you!

Sue

3/16Repertoire

 

 

Thumb Piano     

(descending scale)

Time to sing, time sing

All my friends it’s

(rising scale) time to sing

 

 

Give Me the Beat

Chant by Yvette Holt

 

1.     Set up: Leader taps knees in steady beat.  Everyone taps knees in steady beat.

  1. Leader chants: 

Give me the beat, beat, beat

Give me the beat, beat, beat

Give me the beat, give me the beat

Give me the beat, beat, beat

 

  1. Repeat; everyone joins the chant
  2. Change motion to clapping hands. Everyone chants.

Clap your hands, hands, hands

Clap your hands, hands, hands

Clap your hands, clap your hands

Clap your hands, hands, hands

 

  1. Change motion to tapping the head. Everyone chants.

Touch your head, head, head

Touch your head, head, head

Touch your head, touch your head

Touch your head, head, head

 

6. Use other parts of the body.

 

How could we adapt this to use senses more?

Visual: Leader’s model, icons of possible choices, leader chair icon, photos of students to choose from in picking next leader

Aural: Chant, leader’s cues and spoken choices (use children’s devices as appropriate)

Movement: Beat movement, change from sitting to standing position, change to bigger movements (jump, twist, punch, stomp), move through space (walk, tiptoe, gallop)

Tactile: Feeling of the beat, teddy bear (to designate the leader), everyone has a doll or a stuffed animal to keep the beat on

Imagination: Pat the baby, rock the baby, bounce the baby, jump the baby

 

 

Slide Whistle

Sequence by Sue Trainor

 

Procedure:

1.  Leader demonstrates the slide whistle. 

 

2. Everyone pretends to play a slide whistle. Pretend to hold the whistle and imitate the sound of the slide whistle vocally. (Discuss why the slide whistle is an instrument we can’t share.)

 

3. Everyone imitates the sound of the slide whistle and shows the high and low movement with their hands  Play low to high pitch, until everyone makes the connection between the vocal and physical representations.

 

4.  Play high to low; everyone imitates the sound vocally and shows the movement of the sound with their hands.

 

5. Play a sound; ask children if it is low or high. Ask them to show you with their hands and sing the answer in their voices. Repeat, alternating high and low.

 

6. Follow the sound with other parts of the body (not vocally). Elbows, head, feet, whole body, etc. Stop moving when the sound stops. Move quickly when the pitch changes quickly and slowly when the pitch changes slowly.

 

How can we adapt this to use senses more?

Visual: We see the manipulation of the whistle, we see how others move.  Other visuals. Leader should model the movements at first, but then stop so children have to move from listening and not from watching. Take a video of children so they can see themselves moving. Move in front of a mirror. Play with mirror movement: children face each other and move together to the whistle sound.

Aural: The sound of the slide whistle (or our voices) is the focus. NOTE: if children have sound sensitivity, this strategy should be used with a mellower, metal whistle rather than a plastic one.

Movement: Move to the sound of the whistle. Use a variety of body parts: hand, elbow, head, shoulder, knee, foot, whole body. Use the whistle to walk through general space: toot the whistle in steady beat as children take one step for each toot. If the pitch changes, children crouch as they walk or walk taller.

Tactile: Move an object to the sound of the whistle.

Imagination: Use slide whistle as accompaniment to movement in a role play.

 

Hand-Hand Chant

By Sue Trainor

 

As the leader chants, voice pitch should climb higher and higher, then slide slowly from high to low on “down.”

 

Hand, hand

Reach, reach

Up, up, up, up

Down!

 

How could we adapt this to use senses more?

Because this is a simple strategy, designed for developmentally young children, I recommend keeping it just this simple. Use hand over hand support as needed.

 

Have You Got Your Spot

By Sue Trainor

 

1.  Everyone is sitting on a designated spot. Leader calls; children respond.

Call: Can you sit on your spot ?   Response: Yes I can!

Call: Can you sit on your spot ?   Response: Yes I can!

Call: What are you doing?          Response: Sitting on the spot

Call: What are you doing?          Response: Sitting on the spot

 

Call: Can you clap on your spot ?   Response: Yes I can!  (clap in steady beat)

Call: Can you clap on your spot ?   Response: Yes I can!  (clap in steady beat)

Call: What are you doing?          Response: Clapping on the spot

Call: What are you doing?          Response: Clapping on the spot

 

2. Try another sitting motion or two. If everyone is holding their spot, try standing.

Call: Can you stand on your spot ?   Response: Yes I can!  (etc.)

 

3.  Call: Can you jump on your spot?   Response: Yes I can!  (etc.)

4. Ask for children’s suggestions for movement and substitute those actions into the chant.

5. End with:  Call: “Can You Sit on Your Spot”   Response: Yes I can!  (etc.)

 

How could we adapt this to use senses more?

Visual: Leader’s model, could use picture icons as appropriate for leader to choose the next movement. Another visual component of this is judging one’s own self-space. Can I see that I am in my place?

Aural: Chant.

Movement: Movement in self-space as described. Movement also can be extended to other positional concepts – stand in front, beside, behind, next to, under… Spots could be self-space in the context of a larger game  – like musical chairs

Tactile: Can use spots with a prop or stuffed animal. Is the monkey on the spot? Clean-up – I often ask children to put the spot on some part of their body (head, shoulder, elbow…) and pick up the spots from there.

Imagination: Spots could be self-space in a storytelling sequence; for example, as the character’s “house” or safe space.

 

Here’s What I Learned Chant

By Sue Trainor

Here’s what I learned, oh yeah

Here’s what I learned, oh yeah

Here’s what I learned in our lesson today

Here’s what I learned, oh yeah

Here’s what I learned, oh yeah

Here’s what I learned in our lesson today

 

How could we adapt this to use senses more?

Aural: Chant

Visual: Leader motions, icons for lesson concepts or segments

Movement: Create movements to go with it. I roll my arms and tap my knees

Tactile: Feel of the beat

Imagination: Recall of what we’ve done

 

 

Shake Those Eggs

By Val Carroll

  1. Transition: Hand one egg to each child, singing a transition song  such as (to “Skip to My Lou”) – “Here’s an egg for you and you, here’s an egg for you and you….”

 

  1. Slowly sing the song and model the motions described. Give children time to imitate.  Note the “C*” means C above middle C.

 

G          G          E     E      G       G         C*

Shake those eggs and shake them high

 

 F          F         F         F     A       G        D

Shake those eggs and shake them low

 

G          G          E     E      G       G        C*

Shake those eggs and shake them high

 

D            F     E            D    C        E   C   

Round and round and round we go

 

(same melody)

Shake and shake and shake and stop (3x)

Then we’ll shake and shake some more

 

How could we adapt this to use senses more?

Visual: We see the leader’s model, we could use a song icon

Aural: The song, the sound of the shakers

Movement: Moving with the shakers. We could add other movements and spatial directions. (also, see tactile)

Tactile: The feeling of the shaker and the sensation of the movement inside the shaker. Could substitute other instruments (tap that drum and tap it fast, tap that drum and tap it slow….) or things like scarves.

Imagination: Could be adapted into storytelling. We could be retelling “Giraffes Can’t Dance,” for example:

Giraffes in the circle now, dance up high

Giraffes in the circle now, dance down low

Giraffes in the circle now, dance up high

Now round and round and round you go

Dance and dance and dance and stop (3x)

Then the giraffes can sit back down.

 

Walking Through the Forest

 

 C     C     C    D    E  G   D   G   E   C

Walking through the forest, forest, forest

C    C     C      D   E  G

Walking through the forest

D      D  G  C

What do I see?

(chant) Sh sh sh, I think I see a ____  (Make sound effect and/or motion)

D     G  G   C

Come follow me!

 

How could we adapt this to use senses more?

Visual: Show a picture of a forest, show pictures of things we see in the forest, animal props

Aural:  song, animal sounds, recorded forest sounds

Movement: walk around the room

Tactile: Use animal props, costumes, toy cameras or binoculars

Imagination:  Imagine that we have on hiking outfits; imagine we have cameras or binoculars; imagine that some children are (in the role of) animals

 

Adaptation: This song can be adapted for any purpose involving moving through general space.

-Walking through the park, the hallway, to the bathroom, etc.

-Swimming through the ocean

-Walking to the market / walking to our seats

Funky Duck Chant

By Sue Trainor

 

I’m Funky Duck, hey hey

I’m Funky Duck, hey hey

I want to know

Can you find my ___ today

 

How could we adapt this to use senses more?

Visual:  Puppet duck (or other animal) to which Velcro will stick. The puppet is the visual to draw children’s attention to learning content, such as colors, shapes, letters. numbers, etc.

Aural:  the chant

Movement: Because children are being asked to focus on an object, movement is not part of this strategy, aside from the puppet moving from child to child.

Tactile: the child is asked to take a picture or shape from the duck and replace it.

Imagination: when children have learned the strategy, they can take the role of Funky Duck and take leadership with the puppet.

 

 

 

I HAVE A BOX

Adapted from Katherine Lyons’ version

 

Dramatically, chant:

 

I have a box

The box has a top

Let’s oooooopen it    (open the box slowly and dramatically, pitch rising on “ooopen”

And STOP! (loudly close the box)

 

I have a box

The box has a top

Let’s oooooopen it

And see what we’ve got

 

 

PROP TRANSFORMATION

From Penny Nichols

This is a (box )     response:  It’s a what?

This is a (box )     response:  It’s a what?

This is a (box )     response:  OH, it’s a box!

 

 

FAST / SLOW chant

Collected from MPAC School

 

Clap clap clap your hands

Slowly as you can

Clap clap clap your hands

Slowly as you can

 

repeat for “fast” – substitute other motions

 

 

 

Song :                         AGOO AME

Source:                      Traditional, from Ghana.  Collected from Kofi Dennis.

Objectives:               Steady beat, Call and response  - Taking turns, following routines

Large/small muscle movement and coordination, Auditory/Visual attention 

 

1.  Set-up:  Say, in beat:  I sing "Agoo" -- You sing "Amee"

               G   E                                                       G   E

2.  Sing "Agoo" -- children respond "a-me"

3. Repeat

4. Say: I go first, then you go

  Clap clap clap clap (children echo)

  Clap clap clap clap (children echo)

  Clap clap clap clap (children echo)

  hoo hoo woo hoo (children echo)

  hooo-ey! (Children echo)

 

Sing "Agoo" -- children respond "ame"

Sing "Agoo" -- children respond "ame"

Say: I go first, then you go:

  Shoulder shoulder shoulder shoulder (children echo)

  Shoulder shoulder shoulder shoulder (children echo)

  Shoulder shoulder shoulder shoulder (children echo)

  hoo hoo woo hoo (children echo)

  hooo-ey! (Children echo)

 

Sing "Agoo" -- children respond "amee"

Sing "Agoo" -- children respond "amee”

Say: I go first, then you go:

  Side side side side (children echo)

  Side side side side (children echo)

  Side side side side (children echo)

    hoo hoo woo hoo (children echo)

  hooo-ey! (Children echo)

 

Sing "Agoo" -- children respond "amee"

Sing "Agoo" -- children respond "amee”

Say: I go first, then you go:

  Clap clap clap clap (children echo)

  Shoulder shoulder shoulder shoulder (children echo)

  Side side side side (children echo)

  hoo hoo woo hoo (children echo)

  hooo-ey! (Children echo)

 

 

Extensions:

  • Try other motions, such as stretch up (climbing motions), stretch down,

fly, hop, jump, twist, etc. Always include the “hoo hoo hoo” and “Hoooey!”

  • Invite children to choose motions, from a list (visual or written) or from their imaginations.
  • Invite children to lead motions, either selected by the teacher or motions they’ve chosen.

 

 

Fight for Children - January 29, 2016

Hello, Friends!!

I'm so glad I was able to join you for your PD yesterday. It was my first introduction to your Fight for Children project, and I'm spreading the word already!

Here are the songs and strategies we worked on yesterday. Please remember to check out the Wolf Trap website also - lots more great ideas here: education.wolftrap.org

 

WHO’S A GOOD WATCHER?

  Collected from Mary Gresock

Use steady beat. Presenter models a motion, changes to a new motion on “oops!”

 

Who’s a good watcher,  watcher, watcher?

Who’s a good watcher?

 Show me now!

Ooops!

Extension: On oops, “pass” the lead to a new person.

 

AGOO AME

Collected from Kofi Dennis 

This song comes from Ghana, and roughly translates to "Are You Listening? Yes, I am listening."  This version is my adaptation of the traditional form.

There are two notes in the word "Agoo": F and D on your classroom xylophone. The word Ame is the same two note melody. The rest is chanted. It’s important to keep steady beat in your voice all the time. 

 
Set Up: I sing "Agoo" -- You sing "Amee"
1. Sing "Agoo" -- children respond "amee"  2. Repeat

2. Chant: I go first, then you go
  Chant: Clap clap clap clap (children echo)
  Shoulder shoulder shoulder shoulder (children echo)
  Side side side side (children echo)
  who who who who (children echo)
  whooo-ey! (Children echo)

4. Repeat entire sequence, beginning with Agoo/Amee call and response, twice
 
5. Offer a sequence of 3 new motions, such as climb, down (same motion but toward the floor), fly.
Keep the deep "who" sound and the high "whooey" sound
 
6. Invite the children to add three new motions.

 

SLIDE WHISTLE

1. Invite children to follow the sound with voices and with parts of their bodies. Identify high and low sounds.

2. Toot the whistle and invite children to take the same number of steps as toots – in lines, into a circle, around a circle. Change motions: jump, hop, march, etc.

 

LITTLE FROGS

 by Sue Trainor

 

Objectives:          Moving to music

                                     Identifying on, under

                                     Awareness of one’s body in space

                                    Extended vigorous exericse

Procedure:

1. Spread a green cloth on the floor to represent the lily pad. One by one, take little frogs out of a bag and hop them on to the lily pad, one for each child and adult. 

2. Set-up the song with a phrase to cue the starting note and the beat, such as “Let’s all sing!”

3.

 C  C    E        C       D        G     F   E D  C

Little green frogs jump ON the lily pad,

G     F   E D  C       D     D      G

ON the lily pad, see them jump!

C   C    E         C       D        G     F  E D  C

Little green frogs jump ON the lily pad

G      G       G G    G       G F    D        C

See those little frogs, little frogs jump!

 

4.   Spoken: UH OH! Here comes a big bird looking for a green frog for his supper! (Someone can pretend to be the big bird, flying with arms outstretched.)  Hide, Little Frogs, Hide!

 

5.  Everyone takes their little green frogs and hides them under the cloth.

Sing quietly:

Little green frogs hide UNDER the lily pad,

UNDER the lily pad, see them hide!

Little green frogs hide UNDER the lily pad

See those little frogs, little frogs hide!

 

6. Spoken: That big old bird doesn't see any frogs, so he flies away. Come out little frogs, come out!

Repeat singing the first verse.

 

7. Now WE become the frogs. Repeat the entire sequence.

 

 

 GIVE ME THE BEAT

Source:                                     By Yvette Holt

1.     Set up: Leader taps knees in steady beat.  Everyone taps knees in steady beat.

  1. Leader chants: 

Give me the beat, beat, beat

Give me the beat, beat, beat

Give me the beat, give me the beat

Give me the beat, beat, beat

 

  1. Repeat; everyone joins the chant
  2. Change motion to clapping hands. Everyone chants.

Clap your hands, hands, hands

Clap your hands, hands, hands

Clap your hands, clap your hands

Clap your hands, hands, hands

 

  1. Change motion to tapping the head. Everyone chants.

Touch your head, head, head

Touch your head, head, head

Touch your head, touch your head

Touch your head, head, head

 

Extensions: 

  • Use other parts of the body.
  • Invite children to choose the next body part (from a set of pictures or from imagination).
  • Invite children to lead verses, either teacher selected body part or choosing the body part themselves.
  • Focus on action words: Clap, touch, tap, twist, jump, etc.

 

 

 Have You Got Your Spot?

 By Sue Trainor

 

1.  Everyone is sitting on a designated spot. Leader calls; children respond.

Call: Have you got your spot ?   Response: Yes I do!

Call: Have you got your spot ?   Response: Yes I do!

Call: What are you doing?          Response: Sitting on the spot

Call: What are you doing?          Response: Sitting on the spot

 

Call: Can you stretch on your spot ?   Response: Yes I can!  (stretch arms high)

Call: Can you stretch on your spot ?   Response: Yes I can!  (stretch arms high)

Call: What are you doing?          Response: Stretching on the spot

Call: What are you doing?          Response: Stretching on the spot

 

2. Try another sitting motion or two. If everyone is holding their spot, try standing.

Call: Can you stand on your spot ?   Response: Yes I can!  (etc.)

 

3.  Call: Can you jump on your spot?   Response: Yes I can!  (etc.)

4. Ask for children’s suggestions for movement and substitute those actions into the chant.

5. End with:  Call: “Can You Sit on Your Spot”   Response: Yes I can!  (etc.)

 

Mrs. Tin

 Transition that changes from one topic to another. Builds excitement.

G   E GG    E
Hello Mrs. Tin

Place an object related to the upcoming lesson in a cookie tin. Tell children that Mrs. Tin is still sleeping; we have to wake her up. Invite selected children to "knock on her door." In between knocks, invite all children to sing "Hello Mrs. Tin" in order to encourage vocalization and participation from everyone. Depending on your objectives and the con tents of the tin, children may be invited to hold the tin, shake it, and predict the contents. Depending on the children, the eventual opening of the tin may be dramatic. Depending on the children, you might want to offer peeks at this point, inviting children to keep the secret.

 

 

Walking Through the Forest

Source:                                     Traditional

Procedure:

1.  Introduction:  Invite children to imagine that we are going on a walk in the forest.  What kinds of animals will we see? Show pictures,  and review sounds and motions that the animals make.

2. Begin in a line, with each person facing the back of the person in front.

3. Set-up: Cue singing with a phrase that sets the starting pitch and beat, such as “Here we go!”

4. Sing the song as we walk through the room.

 

C      C      C               D    E    G    D   G    E    C

Walking through the forest, forest, forest

C      C     C          D    E   G

Walking through the forest

D          D  G   C

What do I see

(chant) Sh sh sh, I think I see a ____  (Make sound effect and/or motion)

D         G  G   C

Come, follow me!

 

5. Repeat.

Extensions:

  • Use pictures or stuffed animals for children to discover and identify as we walk through the room.
  • Change “forest” to other locations: walking through the city, on the beach, down the hall, etc.
  

WIGGLE YOUR FINGERS

By Jamaal “Mr. Root” Collier, WT teaching artist

This is a chant that uses words in rhythm. Every stanza has 16 beats, except the last, which has 8.  Movements are as described in the lyric.

 

Wiggle your FINgers (rest, rest)

Wiggle your FINgers (rest, rest)

Wiggle your FINgers (rest, rest)

Wiggle your FINgers, just like this

 

MOVE your elbows

MOVE your elbows

MOVE your elbows

MOVE your elbows

 

Pop your SHOULders, HUNH  (rest)

Pop your SHOULders, HUNH  (rest)

Pop your SHOULders, HUNH  (rest)

Pop your SHOULders, HUNH  (rest)

 

HANDS in the air – SHAKE ‘em up

HANDS in the air – SHAKE ‘em up

HANDS in the air – SHAKE ‘em up

HANDS in the air – SHAKE ‘em up

 

SHAKE ‘em up, SHAKE ‘em up, SHAKE ‘em up, SHAKE ‘em up

SHAKE ‘em up, SHAKE ‘em up, SHAKE ‘em up, SHAKE ‘em up

FREEZE!

Drop your hands.

 

EXTENSION: When students have learned the sequence, do it silently.

Texas Region 1 - October 27, 2015

Hola, Edinburg Friends!

I had wonderful day with you - hope your experience was rewarding useful for you in your classroom.

As promised, here are the strategies we used today. Because we were a small group, I threw in a lot, so I hope I remember them all! If there's something you want that I've forgotten, please email and let me know! My email address is SueTrainor@aol.com - please stay in touch!

Give Me the Beat

Chant by Yvette Holt

1.     Set up: Leader taps knees in steady beat.  Everyone taps knees in steady beat.

  1. Leader chants: 

Give me the beat, beat, beat

Give me the beat, beat, beat

Give me the beat, give me the beat

Give me the beat, beat, beat

  1. Repeat; everyone joins the chant
  2. Change motion to clapping hands. Everyone chants.

Clap your hands, hands, hands

Clap your hands, hands, hands

Clap your hands, clap your hands

Clap your hands, hands, hands

  1. Change motion to tapping the head. Everyone chants.

Touch your head, head, head

Touch your head, head, head

Touch your head, touch your head

Touch your head, head, head

 

6. Use other parts of the body.

How could we adapt this to use senses more?

Visual: Leader’s model, icons of possible choices, leader chair icon, photos of students to choose from in picking next leader

Aural: Chant, leader’s cues and spoken choices (use children’s devices as appropriate)

Movement: Beat movement, change from sitting to standing position, change to bigger movements (jump, twist, punch, stomp), move through space (walk, tiptoe, gallop)

Tactile: Feeling of the beat, teddy bear (to designate the leader), everyone has a doll or a stuffed animal to keep the beat on

Imagination: Pat the baby, rock the baby, bounce the baby, jump the baby

Social/Emotional: Bear Chair - Invite individuals up front to sit in the Bear Chair and choose which motion to lead. Leader then passes the teddy bear to a friend, which designates the next leader to come to the Bear Chair.

 

Slide Whistle

Sequence by Sue Trainor

 Procedure:

1.  Leader demonstrates the slide whistle. 

2. Everyone pretends to play a slide whistle. Pretend to hold the whistle and imitate the sound of the slide whistle vocally. (Discuss why the slide whistle is an instrument we can’t share.)

3. Everyone imitates the sound of the slide whistle and shows the high and low movement with their hands  Play low to high pitch, until everyone makes the connection between the vocal and physical representations.

4.  Play high to low; everyone imitates the sound vocally and shows the movement of the sound with their hands.

5. Play a sound; ask children if it is low or high. Ask them to show you with their hands and sing the answer in their voices. Repeat, alternating high and low.

6. Follow the sound with other parts of the body (not vocally). Elbows, head, feet, whole body, etc. Stop moving when the sound stops. Move quickly when the pitch changes quickly and slowly when the pitch changes slowly.

 

How can we adapt this to use senses more?

Visual: We see the manipulation of the whistle, we see how others move.  Other visuals. Leader should model the movements at first, but then stop so children have to move from listening and not from watching. Take a video of children so they can see themselves moving. Move in front of a mirror. Play with mirror movement: children face each other and move together to the whistle sound.

Aural: The sound of the slide whistle (or our voices) is the focus. NOTE: if children have sound sensitivity, this strategy should be used with a mellower, metal whistle rather than a plastic one.

Movement: Move to the sound of the whistle. Use a variety of body parts: hand, elbow, head, shoulder, knee, foot, whole body. Use the whistle to walk through general space: toot the whistle in steady beat as children take one step for each toot. If the pitch changes, children crouch as they walk or walk taller.

Tactile: Move an object to the sound of the whistle.

Imagination: Use slide whistle as accompaniment to movement in a role play.

 

Hand-Hand Chant

By Sue Trainor

As the leader chants, voice pitch should climb higher and higher, then slide slowly from high to low on “down.”

Hand, hand

Reach, reach

Up, up, up, up

Down!

 

How could we adapt this to use senses more?

Because this is a simple strategy, designed for developmentally young children, I recommend keeping it just this simple. Use hand over hand support as needed.

 

Have You Got Your Spot

By Sue Trainor

1.  Everyone is sitting on a designated spot. Leader calls; children respond.

Call: Can you sit on your spot ?   Response: Yes I can!

Call: Can you sit on your spot ?   Response: Yes I can!

Call: What are you doing?          Response: Sitting on the spot

Call: What are you doing?          Response: Sitting on the spot

 

Call: Can you clap on your spot ?   Response: Yes I can!  (clap in steady beat)

Call: Can you clap on your spot ?   Response: Yes I can!  (clap in steady beat)

Call: What are you doing?          Response: Clapping on the spot

Call: What are you doing?          Response: Clapping on the spot

 

2. Try another sitting motion or two. If everyone is holding their spot, try standing.

Call: Can you stand on your spot ?   Response: Yes I can!  (etc.)

 

3.  Call: Can you jump on your spot?   Response: Yes I can!  (etc.)

4. Ask for children’s suggestions for movement and substitute those actions into the chant.

5. End with:  Call: “Can You Sit on Your Spot”   Response: Yes I can!  (etc.)

 

How could we adapt this to use senses more?

Visual: Leader’s model, could use picture icons as appropriate for leader to choose the next movement. Another visual component of this is judging one’s own self-space. Can I see that I am in my place?

Aural: Chant.

Movement: Movement in self-space as described. Movement also can be extended to other positional concepts – stand in front, beside, behind, next to, under… Spots could be self-space in the context of a larger game  – like musical chairs

Tactile: Can use spots with a prop or stuffed animal. Is the monkey on the spot? Clean-up – I often ask children to put the spot on some part of their body (head, shoulder, elbow…) and pick up the spots from there.

Imagination: Spots could be self-space in a storytelling sequence; for example, as the character’s “house” or safe space.

 

Shake Those Eggs

By Val Carroll

  1. Transition: Hand one egg to each child, singing a transition song  such as (to “Skip to My Lou”) – “Here’s an egg for you and you, here’s an egg for you and you….”
  1. Slowly sing the song and model the motions described. Give children time to imitate.  Note the “C*” means C above middle C.

 

G          G          E     E      G       G         C*

Shake those eggs and shake them high

 F          F         F         F     A       G        D

Shake those eggs and shake them low

G          G          E     E      G       G        C*

Shake those eggs and shake them high

D            F     E            D    C        E   C   

Round and round and round we go

 

(same melody)

Shake and shake and shake and stop (3x)

Then we’ll shake and shake some more

 

How could we adapt this to use senses more?

Visual: We see the leader’s model, we could use a song icon

Aural: The song, the sound of the shakers

Movement: Moving with the shakers. We could add other movements and spatial directions. (also, see tactile)

Tactile: The feeling of the shaker and the sensation of the movement inside the shaker. Could substitute other instruments (tap that drum and tap it fast, tap that drum and tap it slow….) or things like scarves.

Imagination: Could be adapted into storytelling. We could be retelling “Giraffes Can’t Dance,” for example:

Giraffes in the circle now, dance up high

Giraffes in the circle now, dance down low

Giraffes in the circle now, dance up high

Now round and round and round you go

Dance and dance and dance and stop (3x)

Then the giraffes go sit back down.

 

Walking Through the Forest 

 C     C     C    D    E  G   D   G   E   C

Walking through the forest, forest, forest

C    C     C      D   E  G

Walking through the forest

D      D  G  C

What do I see?

(chant) Sh sh sh, I think I see a ____  (Make sound effect and/or motion)

D     G  G   C

Come follow me!

 

How could we adapt this to use senses more?

Visual: Show a picture of a forest, show pictures of things we see in the forest, animal props

Aural:  song, animal sounds, recorded forest sounds

Movement: walk around the room

Tactile: Use animal props, costumes, toy cameras or binoculars

Imagination:  Imagine that we have on hiking outfits; imagine we have cameras or binoculars; imagine that some children are (in the role of) animals

 

Adaptation: This song can be adapted for any purpose involving moving through general space.

-Walking through the park, the hallway, to the bathroom, etc.

-Swimming through the ocean

-Walking to the market / walking to our seats

 

Funky Duck Chant

By Sue Trainor

 

I’m Funky Duck, hey hey

I’m Funky Duck, hey hey

I want to know

Can you find my ___ today

 

How could we adapt this to use senses more?

Visual:  Puppet duck (or other animal) to which Velcro will stick. The puppet is the visual to draw children’s attention to learning content, such as colors, shapes, letters. numbers, etc.

Aural:  the chant

Movement: Because children are being asked to focus on an object, movement is not part of this strategy, aside from the puppet moving from child to child.

Tactile: the child is asked to take a picture or shape from the duck and replace it.

Imagination: when children have learned the strategy, they can take the role of Funky Duck and take leadership with the puppet.

 

Seed Grows to a Tree

-Sue Trainor

Use the slide whistle to cue children to a low level to be seeds. I used cut green felt for our green leaves and scarves for the fall colors.

Use sun, cloud/rain props (I use fun foam to make the visuals). The little song goes uses the playground taunt "nyah nyah" notes. "And the sun shines" are all on the first note; "down" is the second note. Same pattern for rain. The next two lines go to the tune of "Green grass grows all around all around, the green grass grows all around."

    And the sun shines down

    And the rain falls down

    And the seed grows into a little tree

    And the seed grows to a little tree

Use the slide whistle to grow us to a big tall tree

    And the sun shines down

    And the rain falls down

    And the little tree grows to a big big tree

    And the little tree grows big and green

    And the leaves blow around and around and around

    And the leaves blow around and around

 

    And the sun shines down

    And the rain falls down

    And the leaves fall down fall down to the ground

    And the leaves fall down to the ground

 

And then we have to rake them up and put them in the bag!

 

Other Ideas came out today (Please help me with these - I didn't write enough down, including your ideas I want to use myself!)

- Use muffin tins and tennis balls as a pre-Braille tactile strategy.

- Gorilla Glue might seal plastic eggs closed when making shakers.

- Grip Strategy for learning to pick up a pencil or crayon:

Begin as though doing a finger play with Daddy Finger (pointer), Mommy Finger (middle finger) and Brother Thumb. The first idea is to just develop the skill of controlling the fingers so that the tips meet. Keep steady beat opening and closing just those 3 fingers - open, together, open, together... while chanting:

Daddy Finger, Mommy Finger, Brother Thumb, too

Play in front in front of you

Daddy Finger, Mommy Finger, Brother Thumb, too

Play in front in front of you

(Substitute over, next to, behind.... etc)

 

Daddy Finger, Mommy Finger, Brother Thumb, too

Hold the pencil in front of you  (grip the pencil with the point facing the palm of the hand)

Daddy Finger, Mommy Finger, Brother Thumb, too

Hold on while I flip it for you! (Rotate the pencil so the point is facing out and the back is resting on the hand.)

 

Instrumental Music from "Aha"

Look for instrumentals at the Wolf Trap website http://education.wolftrap.org

 

 

 

 

 

DC Collaborative Great Musical Adaptations - September 26, 2015

Hey, Friends! Really enjoyed working with you all this morning, and thanks so much for humoring me and joining in the adaptation of the "Rock, Paper, Scissors" game!

Here are the strategies we used this morning. Feel free to look in other workshop entries for more. Don't forget to check out the <education.wolftrap.org> site, too, and please stay in touch!

Sue

 

 

WHO’S A GOOD WATCHER?

  Collected from Mary Gresock

Use steady beat. Presenter models a motion, changes to a new motion on “oops!”

 

Who’s a good watcher,  watcher, watcher?

Who’s a good watcher?

 Show me now!

Ooops!

Extension: On oops, “pass” the lead to a new person.

 

AGOO AME

Collected from Kofi Dennis

This song comes from Ghana, and roughly translates to "Are You Listening? Yes, I am listening."  This version is my adaptation of the traditional form.

There are two notes in the word "Agoo": F and D on your classroom xylophone. The word Ame is the same two note melody. The rest is chanted. It’s important to keep steady beat in your voice all the time. 

 
Set Up: I sing "Agoo" -- You sing "Amee"
1. Sing "Agoo" -- children respond "amee"  2. Repeat

2. Chant: I go first, then you go
  Chant: Clap clap clap clap (children echo)
  Shoulder shoulder shoulder shoulder (children echo)
  Side side side side (children echo)
  who who who who (children echo)
  whooo-ey! (Children echo)

4. Repeat entire sequence, beginning with Agoo/Amee call and response, twice 
 
5. Offer a sequence of 3 new motions, such as climb, down (same motion but toward the floor), fly.
Keep the deep "who" sound and the high "whooey" sound
 
6. Invite the children to add three new motions.

 

SLIDE WHISTLE

1. Invite children to follow the sound with voices and with parts of their bodies. Identify high and low sounds.

2. Toot the whistle and invite children to take the same number of steps as toots – in lines, into a circle, around a circle. Change motions: jump, hop, march, etc.

 

LITTLE FROGS

 by Sue Trainor

 

Objectives:          Moving to music

                                     Identifying on, under

                                     Awareness of one’s body in space

                                    Extended vigorous exericse

 

 

Procedure:

1. Spread a green cloth on the floor to represent the lily pad. One by one, take little frogs out of a bag and hop them on to the lily pad, one for each child and adult. 

2. Set-up the song with a phrase to cue the starting note and the beat, such as “Let’s all sing!”

3.

 C  C    E        C       D        G     F   E D  C

Little green frogs jump ON the lily pad,

G     F   E D  C       D     D      G

ON the lily pad, see them jump!

C   C    E         C       D        G     F  E D  C

Little green frogs jump ON the lily pad

G      G       G G    G       G F    D        C

See those little frogs, little frogs jump!

 

4.   Spoken: UH OH! Here comes a big bird looking for a green frog for his supper! (Someone can pretend to be the big bird, flying with arms outstretched.)  Hide, Little Frogs, Hide!

 

5.  Everyone takes their little green frogs and hides them under the cloth.

Sing quietly:

Little green frogs hide UNDER the lily pad,

UNDER the lily pad, see them hide!

Little green frogs hide UNDER the lily pad

See those little frogs, little frogs hide!

 

6. Spoken: That big old bird doesn't see any frogs, so he flies away. Come out little frogs, come out!

Repeat singing the first verse.

7. Now WE become the frogs. Repeat the entire sequence.

 

 

 Have You Got Your Spot? 

 By Sue Trainor

 

1.  Everyone is sitting on a designated spot. Leader calls; children respond.

Call: Have you got your spot ?   Response: Yes I do!

Call: Have you got your spot ?   Response: Yes I do!

Call: What are you doing?          Response: Sitting on the spot

Call: What are you doing?          Response: Sitting on the spot

 

Call: Can you stretch on your spot ?   Response:Yes I can!  (stretch arms high)

Call: Can you stretch on your spot ?   Response:Yes I can!  (stretch arms high)

Call: What are you doing?          Response:Stretching on the spot

Call: What are you doing?          Response:Stretching on the spot

 

2. Try another sitting motion or two. If everyone is holding their spot, try standing.

Call: Can you stand on your spot ?   Response: Yes I can!  (etc.)

3.  Call: Can you jump on your spot?   Response:Yes I can!  (etc.)

4. Ask for children’s suggestions for movement and substitute those actions into the chant.

5. End with:  Call: “Can You Sit on Your Spot”   Response: Yes I can!  (etc.)

 

 

Mrs. Tin 

Collected from Mary Gresock, Wolf Trap Master Teaching Artist

Objectives:  Singing Voice, Matching pitch, Tone, Prediction, Participation in a group, Self-regulation

Procedure:

1. Leader holds up a container that contains an object related to the objective of the lesson. 

 

2. Introduce the container as “Mrs. Tin” and tell the children that Mrs. Tin is sleeping.

 

3. Tap on Mrs. Tin and sing “Hello Mrs. Tin” (notes are G E GG E). Sing the song and go around the classroom, allowing the children to tap on Mrs. Tin and sing hello.

 

4. When anticipation is built and enough turns are taken, dramatically open the top and let children peek. 

 

 

ROCK, PAPER, SCISSORS

Collaborative Effort!

 

THE CHANT:

Rock, paper, scissors, huh!

Rock, paper, scissors, huh!

Rock, paper, scissors, huh!

Aaaaaaand shoot! *

 

*I will substitute “go.”

 

 

THE GAME:

 

1. Begin with steady beat on a drum or similar.

 

2. Set up the start with a cue phrase, like “ready, set here we go!”

 

3.  Everyone walks to the beat. On the word “aaaaaaand…” find a partner. On the word “shoot” or “go,” each partner shows either rock, paper or scissors.

Rock beats scissors, paper covers rock, scissors cut paper.

 

4. 4. The loser in the pair gets in line behind the winner. Repeat the sequence, substituting the line-leader’s name instead of “huh,” as a cheer.  Line leaders look for other line leaders to play against; if there are an even number of lines, every line leader must play the round. Everyone in the loser’s line gets behind the winner’s line. IF line-leaders come up with the same sign in any round, it’s a tie and those lines play another round as they are, without joining a line or adding more people to their line.

 

5. Play until there is one winning line.

 

 

 MUSIC suggested by participant:

Barrington Levy (reggae)

  - especially “Work,” “Teach the Youth,” and “Warm and Sunny Day”

 

Fairfax Library, "It's What You Do With It" - September 9, 2015

Hey, Friends! Really enjoyed our workshop today! Excellent discussions, and I collected a lot of new ideas from you. Thanks for sharing! Here is our repertoire, with notes on your creations as well. My notes were cryptic - we'll all have to use them as starters.

Please stay in touch!

Sue

 

Song :                       AGOO AME

Source:                                     Traditional, from Ghana.  Collected from Kofi Dennis.

A few suggested objectives:        Steady beat, Call and response  - Taking turns, following routines

Large/small muscle movement and coordination, Auditory/Visual attention 

 

1.  Set-up:  Say, in beat:  I sing "Agoo" -- You sing "Amee"

               G   E                                                       G   E

2.  Sing "Agoo" -- children respond "a-me"

3. Repeat

4. Say: I go first, then you go

  Clap clap clap clap (children echo)

  Clap clap clap clap (children echo)

  Clap clap clap clap (children echo)

  hoo hoo woo hoo (children echo)

  hooo-ey! (Children echo)

 

Sing "Agoo" -- children respond "ame"

Sing "Agoo" -- children respond "ame"

Say: I go first, then you go:

  Shoulder shoulder shoulder shoulder (children echo)

  Shoulder shoulder shoulder shoulder (children echo)

  Shoulder shoulder shoulder shoulder (children echo)

  hoo hoo woo hoo (children echo)

  hooo-ey! (Children echo)

 

Sing "Agoo" -- children respond "amee"

Sing "Agoo" -- children respond "amee”

Say: I go first, then you go:

  Side side side side (children echo)

  Side side side side (children echo)

  Side side side side (children echo)

    hoo hoo woo hoo (children echo)

  hooo-ey! (Children echo)

 

Sing "Agoo" -- children respond "amee"

Sing "Agoo" -- children respond "amee”

Say: I go first, then you go:

  Clap clap clap clap (children echo)

  Shoulder shoulder shoulder shoulder (children echo)

  Side side side side (children echo)

  hoo hoo woo hoo (children echo)

  hooo-ey! (Children echo)

 

 

Extensions:

  • Try other motions, such as stretch up (climbing motions), stretch down,

fly, hop, jump, twist, etc. Always include the “hoo hoo hoo” and “Hoooey!”

  • Invite children to choose motions, from a list (visual or written) or from their imaginations.
  • Invite children to lead motions, either selected by the teacher or motions they’ve chosen.

 

 

Song :                         Slide Whistle Warm-Up

Source:                                                       Sue Trainor

 

 

Objectives:                            Aural discrimination (high and low)

                                                      Following directions

                                                      Awareness of one’s body in space

                                                      Large Motor coordination

 

 

Procedure:

1.  Leader demonstrates the slide whistle. 

 

2. Everyone pretends to play a slide whistle. Pretend to hold the whistle and imitate the sound of the slide whistle vocally. (Discuss why the slide whistle is an instrument we can’t share.)

 

3. Everyone imitates the sound of the slide whistle and shows the high and low movement with their hands  Play low to high pitch, until everyone makes the connection between the vocal and physical representations.

 

4.  Play high to low; everyone imitates the sound vocally and shows the movement of the sound with their hands.

 

5. Play a sound; ask children if it is low or high. Ask them to show you with their hands and sing the answer in their voices. Repeat, alternating high and low.

 

6. Follow the sound with other parts of the body (not vocally). Elbows, head, feet, whole body, etc. Stop moving when the sound stops. Move quickly when the pitch changes quickly and slowly when the pitch changes slowly.

 

 

 

 

 

Song :                       The Cows Are Lost

Source:                                     Traditional

A few suggested objectives:        Singing voice, Matching Pitch, Loud/Quiet, Fast/Slow, identifying animals

 

Sung slowly and quietly:

 

G    G        G     C     G    G    G   C   G   G   G   C      G   G     G        C

The cows are lost, the sun is low, I think I'll rest, 'til they come home

 

Sung fast and more loudly:

 

G        G     G    E   C   E        G    G   F      D     G   G-F-D

Wake up you sleepy head, and go and hunt the cows,

G        G     G    E  C    E          G   G   F     D      D     C 

wake up you sleepy heads, and go and hunt the cows

 

Extension:

- Repeat with other animals, for example, from "I Went Walking"

- Ask children to find the cow among other animals

- Ask children to go on a treasure hunt to find the cows in the room.

 

Song :                       Bears Eat Fish

Source:                                     Sue Trainor, original

A few suggested objectives:        Singing voice, Matching Pitch, healthy eating, cognitive development, self-regulation, dramatic play, locomotor movement

 Role Play: The leader says: "Let's pretend to be bears!Will our bears be big or small? Big? Ok, let me see your big bear arms. (Comment on what individual children are doing.) Show me your big bear legs. (Comment on what children are doing.). My bear is hungry! How about yours?"

Melody: Within a few repetitions, children will join the singing of this song, so it’s important to sing in “head voice.”

Steady Beat: Because we’re pretending to be big bears, the speed of the song is moderate to slow, with heavy emphasis on each word: “Bears    eat     fish.”  (Note that there is a rest in the lyrics – there are 4 beats in each line, but only three words – tap the 4th beat in order to keep steady beat.) 

 

Sing:

E         D     C
Bears eat fish
E         D     C
Bears eat fish
      F       F   G   A  G
    When I am hungry
     E          E       F  G
     That's what I wish
E          D   C
Bears eat fish

Still pretending to be bears, children go out around the room to find fish-shaped props and bring them back.to the meeting area, while we sing:  “Bears catch fish….”

Children place their fish on a cookie sheet, which we pretend to put in the oven. Sing:  “Bears cook fish….”
 
 Make a "ding" sound like a kitchen timer and take the fish out of the "oven."  Each child takes a fish and pretends to eat. Sing:   “Bears eat fish….”
 Take off our pretend bear costumes and collect the fish props.

Recall details about our experience, such as Where did you catch the fish? What color fish did you catch? Did your bear like to eat the fish?

 

 

Song :                        Awa Atu

Source:                                     Traditional, from Ghana. Collected from Kofi Dennis.

A few suggested objectives:        Singing voice, Matching pitch,  Expressing feelings, Managing transition (closing)

 

  1. Explain the words and motions:

“Awa” means “I’m happy we are together.”  Hold arms open and wide, and wave them up and down as though you are happy to see your friends.

“Atu” means “hug.”  Fold arms across your chest, hugging yourself.

 

2. Set-up: Sing a cue phrase in order to give children the starting pitch and beat. “Let’s all sing.”

 

3. Everyone sings the song and does the motions together.

 

D –G D-G D-G

Awa Awa Awa

A-B A-B A-B

Atu Atu Atu

B-c-A…….

Awa

A-B-G…..

Atu

 

4. Repeat, perhaps several times.

 

Extensions:

  • Begin in a circle so that everyone is facing. Make eye contact.
  • Begin in two circles, one circle faces in. The second circle of people is inside facing people in the outer circle. Rotate the inner circle with each repetition. If appropriate, people may hug each other.

 

And we talked about: “Bingo”

-       With the objective of +1 math: Use a visual with a symbol (could be numerals) to represent claps (so it might show “1 ingo,” then “1 2 ngo,” etc. Could also be other animals besides dogs. Could be cats: “meow meow ngo…...

 

-       And your creations included (my notes are a bit cryptic):

-       Book: “Be Quiet, Mike” – Goal: Loud/Quiet, older children, add where we are loud and quiet. – Tune “Are You Sleeping” – Ask: What will we pretend to be? A train? What sound does that make? Is it loud or quiet? Sing: Now we’re loud….

Later, add imaginary travel to places where loud or quiet is appropriate – oh, we’re in the gym / in the library….

-       “Snip Snap” – Goal: affirmation that we are brave. Alligator Box strategy, children pull out pics of things the alligator ate. Tune is playground song “nyah, nyah” – also “Rain Rain Go Away” – “What did alligator eat?” Child shows picture and names it, puts it back in alligator mouth, “now I’m brave.” (Note, maybe alligator is sleeping when we first take things out.)

-       “We Are Monsters” to the tune of “Are You Sleeping” – Goal: Colors, and general theme of not being afraid of monsters. “We are monsters. We are monsters, we are ____ (small group of children hold up their scarves and either name their color or invite others to name the color), “here’s what we look like / here’s what we sound like ____ (open-ended: children can show what their monsters look/sound like).

-       “Very Hungry Caterpillar” – Goal: Counting 1-10, one-to-one correspondence. Visuals that connect seeds (1-10) with flowers/fruits growing (1-10). Also, what plants need to grow. Melody: “Pop Goes the Weasel” –

The seed goes down in the ground

                  Waiting for water

The sun shines brightly on the seed

Pop goes the flower

 

 

 

Mo. Co. Head Start - July 16, 2015

Thanks so much for including me in your professional development programs this week. I truly enjoyed working with you!

Here are the songs and chants we used today. Please let me know if you have questions, and please stay in touch!

Also, remember to check out the new Wolf Trap website at Education.WolfTrap.org. Note: It's NOT www.Education.WolfTrap.org. You'll get an error message if you use that.

 

WHO'S A GOOD WATCHER?

  Collected from Mary Gresock

Use steady beat. Presenter models a motion, changes to a new motion on “oops!”

 

Who’s a good watcher,  watcher, watcher?

Who’s a good watcher?

 Show me now!

Ooops!

Extension: On oops, “pass” the lead to a new person.

 

AGOO AME

Collected from Kofi Dennis 

This song comes from Ghana, and roughly translates to "Are You Listening? Yes, I am listening."  This version is my adaptation of the traditional form.

There are two notes in the word "Agoo": F and D on your classroom xylophone. The word Ame is the same two note melody. The rest is chanted. It’s important to keep steady beat in your voice all the time. 

 
Set Up: I sing "Agoo" -- You sing "Amee"
1. Sing "Agoo" -- children respond "amee"  2. Repeat

2. Chant: I go first, then you go
  Chant: Clap clap clap clap (children echo)
  Shoulder shoulder shoulder shoulder (children echo)
  Side side side side (children echo)
  who who who who (children echo)
  whooo-ey! (Children echo)

4. Repeat entire sequence, beginning with Agoo/Amee call and response, twice
 
5. Offer a sequence of 3 new motions, such as climb, down (same motion but toward the floor), fly.
Keep the deep "who" sound and the high "whooey" sound
 
6. Invite the children to add three new motions.

 

SLIDE WHISTLE

1. Invite children to follow the sound with voices and with parts of their bodies. Identify high and low sounds.

2. Toot the whistle and invite children to take the same number of steps as toots – in lines, into a circle, around a circle. Change motions: jump, hop, march, etc.

 

LITTLE FROGS

 by Sue Trainor

 

Objectives:          Moving to music

                                     Identifying on, under

                                     Awareness of one’s body in space

                                    Extended vigorous exericse

 

Procedure:

1. Spread a green cloth on the floor to represent the lily pad. One by one, take little frogs out of a bag and hop them on to the lily pad, one for each child and adult. 

2. Set-up the song with a phrase to cue the starting note and the beat, such as “Let’s all sing!”

3.

 C  C    E        C       D        G     F   E D  C

Little green frogs jump ON the lily pad,

G     F   E D  C       D     D      G

ON the lily pad, see them jump!

C   C    E         C       D        G     F  E D  C

Little green frogs jump ON the lily pad

G      G       G G    G       G F    D        C

See those little frogs, little frogs jump!

 

4.   Spoken: UH OH! Here comes a big bird looking for a green frog for his supper! (Someone can pretend to be the big bird, flying with arms outstretched.)  Hide, Little Frogs, Hide!

 

5.  Everyone takes their little green frogs and hides them under the cloth.

Sing quietly:

Little green frogs hide UNDER the lily pad,

UNDER the lily pad, see them hide!

Little green frogs hide UNDER the lily pad

See those little frogs, little frogs hide!

 

6. Spoken: That big old bird doesn't see any frogs, so he flies away. Come out little frogs, come out!

Repeat singing the first verse.

 

7. Now WE become the frogs. Repeat the entire sequence.

 

 

 GIVE ME THE BEAT

Source:                                     By Yvette Holt

1.     Set up: Leader taps knees in steady beat.  Everyone taps knees in steady beat.

  1. Leader chants: 

Give me the beat, beat, beat

Give me the beat, beat, beat

Give me the beat, give me the beat

Give me the beat, beat, beat

 

  1. Repeat; everyone joins the chant
  2. Change motion to clapping hands. Everyone chants.

Clap your hands, hands, hands

Clap your hands, hands, hands

Clap your hands, clap your hands

Clap your hands, hands, hands

 

  1. Change motion to tapping the head. Everyone chants.

Touch your head, head, head

Touch your head, head, head

Touch your head, touch your head

Touch your head, head, head

 

Extensions: 

  • Use other parts of the body.
  • Invite children to choose the next body part (from a set of pictures or from imagination).
  • Invite children to lead verses, either teacher selected body part or choosing the body part themselves.
  • Focus on action words: Clap, touch, tap, twist, jump, etc.

 

 

 CAN YOU SIT ON YOUR SPOT?

 By Sue Trainor

 

1.  Everyone is sitting on a designated spot. Leader calls; children respond.

Call: Can you sit on your spot ?   Response: Yes I can!

Call: Can you sit on your spot ?   Response: Yes I can!

Call: What are you doing?          Response: Sitting on the spot

Call: What are you doing?          Response: Sitting on the spot

 

Call: Can you stretch on your spot ?   Response: Yes I can!  (stretch arms high)

Call: Can you stretch on your spot ?   Response: Yes I can!  (stretch arms high)

Call: What are you doing?          Response: Stretching on the spot

Call: What are you doing?          Response: Stretching on the spot

 

2. Try another sitting motion or two. If everyone is holding their spot, try standing.

Call: Can you stand on your spot ?   Response: Yes I can!  (etc.)

 

3.  Call: Can you jump on your spot?   Response: Yes I can!  (etc.)

4. Ask for children’s suggestions for movement and substitute those actions into the chant.

5. End with:  Call: “Can You Sit on Your Spot”   Response: Yes I can!  (etc.)

 

Mrs. Tin

 Transition that changes from one topic to another. Builds excitement.

 

G   E GG    E
Hello Mrs. Tin

Place an object related to the upcoming lesson in a cookie tin. Tell children that Mrs. Tin is still sleeping; we have to wake her up. Invite selected children to "knock on her door." In between knocks, invite all children to sing "Hello Mrs. Tin" in order to encourage vocalization and participation from everyone. Depending on your objectives and the con tents of the tin, children may be invited to hold the tin, shake it, and predict the contents. Depending on the children, the eventual opening of the tin may be dramatic. Depending on the children, you might want to offer peeks at this point, inviting children to keep the secret.

 

HOLD IT!

Adaptation of an experience developed by Wolf Trap Master Teaching Artist Roberta Lucas

 

This is a Cumulative Song: each verse repeats exactly, but adds new words onto what came before. This also is an Echo Song: Leader sings or calls out each, and participants echo back.

 

1.

Leader: Wake up toes it's time to dance (make a toe motion)

Leader: Time to jump and time to prance (add jump, and "prance" motion) 

Leader: Hold it!   (hold hands out in “stop” pose)

Leader: Hands UP  (raise arms)

Leader: Chi-chi cha-cha chi-chi cha-cha Go-Go-Go!  (make a wiggley motion with hands still raised in the air) 

 

2. Repeat the song, and after Hands UP (echo) add  feet apart! (echo) then do chi-chi… refrain.

 

3. Repeat -- do Hands UP (echo), feet apart (echo), add knees bent (echo) , chi-chi…. Refrain.

 

Others to add:

-- knees together

-- bottoms out

-- heads up

-- tongues out

 

Walking Through the Forest

Source:                                     Traditional

 

Procedure:

1.  Introduction:  Invite children to imagine that we are going on a walk in the forest.  What kinds of animals will we see? Show pictures,  and review sounds and motions that the animals make.

 

2. Begin in a line, with each person facing the back of the person in front.

 

3. Set-up: Cue singing with a phrase that sets the starting pitch and beat, such as “Here we go!”

 

4. Sing the song as we walk through the room.

 

C      C      C               D    E    G    D   G    E    C

Walking through the forest, forest, forest

C      C     C          D    E   G

Walking through the forest

D          D  G   C

What do I see?

 

(chant) Sh sh sh, I think I see a ____  (Make sound effect and/or motion)

 

D         G  G   C

Come, follow me!

 

5. Repeat.

 

Extensions:

  • Use pictures or stuffed animals for children to discover and identify as we walk through the room.
  • Change “forest” to other locations: walking through the city, on the beach, down the hall, etc.

 

PRECIPITATION

-      Sue Trainor

Sing (Adams Family): Word of the day (clap, clap)….

  1. Reveal “precipitation.” What do you think that word means?
  2. Teachers: Please join this conversation. 
  3. I made a song about it!

Refrain:

  c    c  c    D#         c

Pre-ci-pi-taaaaaa – tion

c      c c      D#        c

Pre-ci-pi-taaaaaa - tion

 

  1. Teach the verse:

C         F    F    F      C        D#  D    C

Sometimes it rains, sometimes it snows

C         D    D    D      C    C       D#   D       C

Sometimes ice falls from the clouds, you know

C      F     F     F     C    D#    D      C

We need that rain, we need that snow

C    D     D   E E      F       G

It helps all living things grow!

 

            Repeat refrain

 

    7.  Let’s make movements for the different kinds of precipitation. Which one should we do first?   All stand up; try things.  TA/teachers notice different choices. Choose one.   Repeat .  How could we show “all living things grow?”

  1. The song says “Sometimes” – maybe some people could be rain and some people could be snow. How could we decide who will take which part?

     9.  Put it all together.

 

LIFE CYCLES GOES AROUND

-Sue Trainor

 

Objectives:

1)    Use the phrase “Life Cycle”

2)    Retell the sequence of the book.

 

 

DAY 1

- Here are are. Look around. What do you see?

-        Show leaf prop. Sing, to the tune of “Green Grass Grows All Around”:

 

In the garden    there was a leaf

The prettiest leaf     that you ever did see

            Leaf in the garden and

            The life cycle goes around and around

The life cycle goes around.

 

-        TEACHER, please briefly discuss with children: What’s a cycle? What does that mean? What does life cycle mean?

 

- Add to the leaf prop, an egg prop.

And on that leaf    there was an egg

The prettiest egg     that you ever did see

            Egg on the leaf and the leaf in the garden and

            The life cycle goes around and around

The life cycle goes around.

 

-        Teacher please co-lead the discussion: What could be in the egg?

 

-        Out of the egg comes a caterpillar prop

And in that egg   there was a caterpillar

The prettiest caterpillar     that you ever did see

Caterpillar in the egg and the

Egg on the leaf and the

Leaf in the garden and

The life cycle goes around and around

The life cycle goes around.

 

AND HE WAS SO HUNGRY! 

REPEAT: Create hand/arm gestures for leaf, egg and caterpillar.

REPEAT: Create full-body representations.  Use a green cloth to represent the leaf. Have small groups come to the front to be eggs hatching into caterpillars.

AND HE WAS SO HUNGRY, he walked off looking for something to eat. Bye caterpillar!

DAY 2

-        Sing the song with hand/arm gestures to review the story so far.

 

-        That caterpillar was so hungry!

Chant in steady beat:

                  Caterpillar, Caterpillar

Caterpillar, Caterpillar

What do caterpillars do?

All they do is chew and chew!

 

      -  Our caterpillars are looking for food.

MODEL: Caterpillars walk slowly – keep a slow, steady beat with the drum.  Look for food, find it, bring it slowly back to the circle.

TREASURE HUNT: Food (copies of the food in the book, one apple, two pears, etc.) is placed around the room for our caterpillars to find. Each child gets a caterpillar image. Manage children’s movement as agreed, depart the circle by table, for example. KEEP STEADY BEAT and continue the chant.

Children find food and bring it back to the circle, still walking to slow steady beat.

                                    Chant: Munch, munch, munch-munch-munch

Discuss: What did your caterpillar eat?  Optional: Invite children to put food illustrations in a sequence.

We’ll leave our caterpillars to eat and grow! 

 

 

Day 3

Finish the song; put it in our bodies as on Day 1. 

Use  props or icons posted in sequence to help children remember.

And on that caterpillar, there is a chrysalis

The prettiest chrysalis  that you ever did see

Chrysalis on the caterpillar and the

Caterpillar in the egg and the

Egg on the leaf and the

Leaf in the garden and

The life cycle goes around and around

The life cycle goes around.

 

                  And in the crysallis   there is a butterfly

                  The prettiest butterfly   that you ever did see

                  Butterfly in the chrysalis

Chrysalis on the caterpillar and the

Caterpillar in the egg and the

Egg on the leaf and the

Leaf in the garden and

The life cycle goes around and around

The life cycle goes around.

 

                  And in that butterfly    there is an egg

                  The prettiest egg    that you ever did see

                  Egg in the butterfly  and the

Butterfly in the chrysalis

Chrysalis on the caterpillar and the

Caterpillar in the egg and the

Egg on the leaf and the

Leaf in the garden and

The life cycle goes around and around

The life cycle goes around.

 

And what do you think happened to the egg in the butterfly?

 

 

 

San Antonio Pre-K 4 SA - June 11, 2015

Hi, San Antonio Friends!!

Here is repertoire and some planning ideas from our workshops June 10 & 11. I truly enjoyed working with you all! Please stay in touch, and remember to sign up for the Wolf Trap website: www.education.wolftrap.org             

Welcome to the Wolf Trap family!

Sue

 

Who's a Good Watcher

 Collected from Mary Gresock

Use steady beat. Presenter models a motion, changes to a new motion on “oops!”

 

Who’s a good watcher,  watcher, watcher?

Who’s a good watcher?

 Show me now!

Ooops!

Extension: On oops, “pass” the lead to a new person.

 

AGOO AME

Collected from Kofi Dennis

This song comes from Ghana, and roughly translates to "Are You Listening? Yes, I am listening."  This version is my adaptation of the traditional form.

There are two notes in the word "Agoo": F and D on your classroom xylophone. The word Ame is the same two note melody. The rest is chanted. It’s important to keep steady beat in your voice all the time.

 
Set Up: I sing "Agoo" -- You sing "Amee"
1. Sing "Agoo" -- children respond "amee"  2. Repeat

2. Chant: I go first, then you go
  Chant: Clap clap clap clap (children echo)
  Shoulder shoulder shoulder shoulder (children echo)
  Side side side side (children echo)
  who who who who (children echo)
  whooo-ey! (Children echo)

4. Repeat entire sequence, beginning with Agoo/Amee call and response, twice
 
5. Offer a sequence of 3 new motions, such as climb, down (same motion but toward the floor), fly.
Keep the deep "who" sound and the high "whooey" sound
 
6. Invite the children to add three new motions.

SLIDE WHISTLE

1. Invite children to follow the sound with voices and with parts of their bodies. Identify high and low sounds.

2. Toot the whistle and invite children to take the same number of steps as toots – in lines, into a circle, around a circle. Change motions: jump, hop, march, etc.

 

LITTLE FROGS

 by Sue Trainor

 

Objectives:          Moving to music

                                     Identifying on, under

                                     Awareness of one’s body in space

                                    Extended vigorous exericse

 

                   

Procedure:

1. Spread a green cloth on the floor to represent the lily pad. One by one, take little frogs out of a bag and hop them on to the lily pad, one for each child and adult.

2. Set-up the song with a phrase to cue the starting note and the beat, such as “Let’s all sing!”

3.

 C  C    E        C       D        G     F   E D  C

Little green frogs jump ON the lily pad,

G     F   E D  C       D     D      G

ON the lily pad, see them jump!

C   C    E         C       D        G     F  E D  C

Little green frogs jump ON the lily pad

G      G       G G    G       G F    D        C

See those little frogs, little frogs jump!

 

4.   Spoken: UH OH! Here comes a big bird looking for a green frog for his supper! (Someone can pretend to be the big bird, flying with arms outstretched.)  Hide, Little Frogs, Hide!

 

5.  Everyone takes their little green frogs and hides them under the cloth.

Sing quietly:

Little green frogs hide UNDER the lily pad,

UNDER the lily pad, see them hide!

Little green frogs hide UNDER the lily pad

See those little frogs, little frogs hide!

 

6. Spoken: That big old bird doesn't see any frogs, so he flies away. Come out little frogs, come out!

Repeat singing the first verse.

7. Now WE become the frogs. Repeat the entire sequence.

 

 GIVE ME THE BEAT

Source:                                     By Yvette Holt

1.     Set up: Leader taps knees in steady beat.  Everyone taps knees in steady beat.

2.     Leader chants:

Give me the beat, beat, beat

Give me the beat, beat, beat

Give me the beat, give me the beat

Give me the beat, beat, beat

 

3.     Repeat; everyone joins the chant

4.     Change motion to clapping hands. Everyone chants.

Clap your hands, hands, hands

Clap your hands, hands, hands

Clap your hands, clap your hands

Clap your hands, hands, hands

 

5.     Change motion to tapping the head. Everyone chants.

Touch your head, head, head

Touch your head, head, head

Touch your head, touch your head

Touch your head, head, head

 

Extensions:

Use other parts of the body.
Invite children to choose the next body part (from a set of pictures or from imagination).
Invite children to lead verses, either teacher selected body part or choosing the body part themselves.
Focus on action words: Clap, touch, tap, twist, jump, etc.
 

 Have You Got Your Spot?

 By Sue Trainor

1.  Everyone is sitting on a designated spot. Leader calls; children respond.

Call: Have you got your spot ?   Response: Yes I do!

Call: Have you got your spot ?   Response: Yes I do!

Call: What are you doing?          Response: Sitting on the spot

Call: What are you doing?          Response: Sitting on the spot

 

Call: Can you stretch on your spot ?   Response: Yes I can!  (stretch arms high)

Call: Can you stretch on your spot ?   Response: Yes I can!  (stretch arms high)

Call: What are you doing?          Response: Stretching on the spot

Call: What are you doing?          Response: Stretching on the spot



2. Try another sitting motion or two. If everyone is holding their spot, try standing.

Call: Can you stand on your spot ?   Response: Yes I can!  (etc.)

3.  Call: Can you jump on your spot?   Response: Yes I can!  (etc.)

4. Ask for children’s suggestions for movement and substitute those actions into the chant.

5. End with:  Call: “Can You Sit on Your Spot”   Response: Yes I can!  (etc.)

 

Walking Through the Forest
Source:                                     Traditional
                   
Procedure:
1.  Introduction:  Invite children to imagine that we are going on a walk in the forest.  What kinds of animals will we see? Show pictures,  and review sounds and motions that the animals make.
 
2. Begin in a line, with each person facing the back of the person in front.
 
3. Set-up: Cue singing with a phrase that sets the starting pitch and beat, such as “Here we go!”
 
4. Sing the song as we walk through the room.
 
C      C      C               D    E    G    D   G    E    C
Walking through the forest, forest, forest
C      C     C          D    E   G
Walking through the forest
D          D  G   C
What do I see?
 
(chant) Sh sh sh, I think I see a ____  (Make sound effect and/or motion)
 
D         G  G   C

Come, follow me!
 
5. Repeat.
 
Extensions:
Use pictures or stuffed animals for children to discover and identify as we walk through the room.
Change “forest” to other locations: walking through the city, on the beach, down the hall, etc.
 
 
  Song :    Here’s What I Like       

 by Sue Trainor

 Objectives:   Steady Beat, Recall, Describing events    
Procedure:

1.  Leader chants, with motions:
 
Here’s what I like (roll hands)
Oh yeah (point with right hand)
Here’s what I like (roll hands)
Oh yeah (point with left hand)
Here’s what I like (roll hands)
 In our lesson today (tap knees with both hands)
 2. Repeat. Invite children to join motions and the chant.
3. Invite children to recall what was done in the lesson. A quick review by the leader may be helpful in some cases.
 
 Awa Atu
Source: Traditional, from Ghana. Collected from Kofi Dennis.

Objectives:  Singing voice, Matching pitch, Expressing feelings, Managing transition (closing)
Procedure:

1. Explain the words and motions:

“Awa” means “I’m happy we are together”
  Hold arms open and wide, and wave them up and down as though you are happy to see your friends.
“Atu” means “hug.”
Fold arms across your chest, hugging yourself.
2. Set-up: Sing a cue phrase in order to give children the starting pitch and beat. “Let’s all sing.”
3. Everyone sings the song and does the motions together.
 
D –G D-G D-G
Awa Awa Awa
A-B A-B A-B
Atu Atu Atu
B-c-A…….
Awa
A-B-G…..
Atu
4. Repeat, perhaps several times.

Extensions:
Begin in a circle so that everyone is facing. Make eye contact.
Begin in two circles, one circle faces in. The second circle of people is inside facing people in the outer circle. Rotate the inner circle with each repetition. If appropriate, people may hug each other.


Mrs. Tin

Collected from Mary Gresock, Wolf Trap Master Teaching Artist

Objectives:  Singing Voice, Matching pitch, Tone, Prediction, Participation in a group, Self-regulation

Procedure:

1. Leader holds up a container that contains an object related to the objective of the lesson.

2. Introduce the container as “Mrs. Tin” and tell the children that Mrs. Tin is sleeping.

3. Tap on Mrs. Tin and sing “Hello Mrs. Tin” (notes are G E GG E). Sing the song and go around the classroom, allowing the children to tap on Mrs. Tin and sing hello.

4. When anticipation is built and enough turns are taken, dramatically open the top and let children peek.

 HOLD IT!

Adaptation of an experience developed by Wolf Trap Master Teaching Artist Roberta Lucas

This is a Cumulative Song: each verse repeats exactly, but adds new words onto what came before. This also is an Echo Song: Leader sings or calls out each, and participants echo back.

1.

Leader: Wake up toes it's time to dance (make a toe motion)

Leader: Time to jump and time to prance (add jump, and "prance" motion)

Leader: Hold it!   (hold hands out in “stop” pose)

Leader: Hands UP  (raise arms)

Leader: Chi-chi cha-cha chi-chi cha-cha Go-Go-Go!  (make a wiggley motion with hands still raised in the air)

2. Repeat the song, and after Hands UP (echo) add  feet apart! (echo) then do chi-chi… refrain.

3. Repeat -- do Hands UP (echo), feet apart (echo), add knees bent (echo) , chi-chi…. Refrain.

 Others to add:

-- knees together

-- bottoms out

-- heads up

-- tongues out

 

ECP Great Adaptations Workshop - April 19, 2015

Hi, all! Thanks for joining me yesterday. As promised, here are the music experiences we explored during our time together. Hope the experiences you planned are successful for you - let me know how it goes!

Also, because I ran out of the "Great Musical Adaptations" handout, here is the link to that:

https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/104144294/GreatAdaptationsMasterRevised2%20copy.doc

 

Here are the music experiences:

WHO’S A GOOD WATCHER?

  Collected from Mary Gresock

Use steady beat. Presenter models a motion, changes to a new motion on “oops!”

 

Who’s a good watcher,  watcher, watcher?

Who’s a good watcher?

 Show me now!

Ooops!

Extension: On oops, “pass” the lead to a new person.

 

AGOO AME

Collected from Kofi Dennis 

This song comes from Ghana, and roughly translates to "Are You Listening? Yes, I am listening."  This version is my adaptation of the traditional form.

There are two notes in the word "Agoo": F and D on your classroom xylophone. The word Ame is the same two note melody. The rest is chanted. It’s important to keep steady beat in your voice all the time. 

 
Set Up: I sing "Agoo" -- You sing "Amee"
1. Sing "Agoo" -- children respond "amee"  2. Repeat

2. Chant: I go first, then you go
  Chant: Clap clap clap clap (children echo)
  Shoulder shoulder shoulder shoulder (children echo)
  Side side side side (children echo)
  who who who who (children echo)
  whooo-ey! (Children echo)

4. Repeat entire sequence, beginning with Agoo/Amee call and response, twice
 
5. Offer a sequence of 3 new motions, such as climb, down (same motion but toward the floor), fly.
Keep the deep "who" sound and the high "whooey" sound
 
6. Invite the children to add three new motions.

 

SLIDE WHISTLE

1. Invite children to follow the sound with voices and with parts of their bodies. Identify high and low sounds.

2. Toot the whistle and invite children to take the same number of steps as toots – in lines, into a circle, around a circle. Change motions: jump, hop, march, etc.

 

LITTLE FROGS

 by Sue Trainor

 

Objectives:          Moving to music

                                     Identifying on, under

                                     Awareness of one’s body in space

                                    Extended vigorous exericse

 

Procedure:

1. Spread a green cloth on the floor to represent the lily pad. One by one, take little frogs out of a bag and hop them on to the lily pad, one for each child and adult. 

2. Set-up the song with a phrase to cue the starting note and the beat, such as “Let’s all sing!”

3.

 C  C    E        C       D        G     F   E D  C

Little green frogs jump ON the lily pad,

G     F   E D  C       D     D      G

ON the lily pad, see them jump!

C   C    E         C       D        G     F  E D  C

Little green frogs jump ON the lily pad

G      G       G G    G       G F    D        C

See those little frogs, little frogs jump!

 

4.   Spoken: UH OH! Here comes a big bird looking for a green frog for his supper! (Someone can pretend to be the big bird, flying with arms outstretched.)  Hide, Little Frogs, Hide!

 

5.  Everyone takes their little green frogs and hides them under the cloth.

Sing quietly:

Little green frogs hide UNDER the lily pad,

UNDER the lily pad, see them hide!

Little green frogs hide UNDER the lily pad

See those little frogs, little frogs hide!

 

6. Spoken: That big old bird doesn't see any frogs, so he flies away. Come out little frogs, come out!

Repeat singing the first verse.

 

7. Now WE become the frogs. Repeat the entire sequence.

 

 

 GIVE ME THE BEAT

Source:                                     By Yvette Holt

1.     Set up: Leader taps knees in steady beat.  Everyone taps knees in steady beat.

  1. Leader chants: 

Give me the beat, beat, beat

Give me the beat, beat, beat

Give me the beat, give me the beat

Give me the beat, beat, beat

 

  1. Repeat; everyone joins the chant
  2. Change motion to clapping hands. Everyone chants.

Clap your hands, hands, hands

Clap your hands, hands, hands

Clap your hands, clap your hands

Clap your hands, hands, hands

 

  1. Change motion to tapping the head. Everyone chants.

Touch your head, head, head

Touch your head, head, head

Touch your head, touch your head

Touch your head, head, head

 

Extensions: 

  • Use other parts of the body.
  • Invite children to choose the next body part (from a set of pictures or from imagination).
  • Invite children to lead verses, either teacher selected body part or choosing the body part themselves.
  • Focus on action words: Clap, touch, tap, twist, jump, etc.

 

 

 Have You Got Your Spot?

 By Sue Trainor

 

1.  Everyone is sitting on a designated spot. Leader calls; children respond.

Call: Have you got your spot ?   Response: Yes I do!

Call: Have you got your spot ?   Response: Yes I do!

Call: What are you doing?          Response: Sitting on the spot

Call: What are you doing?          Response: Sitting on the spot

 

Call: Can you stretch on your spot ?   Response: Yes I can!  (stretch arms high)

Call: Can you stretch on your spot ?   Response: Yes I can!  (stretch arms high)

Call: What are you doing?          Response: Stretching on the spot

Call: What are you doing?          Response: Stretching on the spot

 

2. Try another sitting motion or two. If everyone is holding their spot, try standing.

Call: Can you stand on your spot ?   Response: Yes I can!  (etc.)

 

3.  Call: Can you jump on your spot?   Response: Yes I can!  (etc.)

4. Ask for children’s suggestions for movement and substitute those actions into the chant.

5. End with:  Call: “Can You Sit on Your Spot”   Response: Yes I can!  (etc.)

 

Mrs. Tin

 Transition that changes from one topic to another. Builds excitement.

G   E GG    E
Hello Mrs. Tin

Place an object related to the upcoming lesson in a cookie tin. Tell children that Mrs. Tin is still sleeping; we have to wake her up. Invite selected children to "knock on her door." In between knocks, invite all children to sing "Hello Mrs. Tin" in order to encourage vocalization and participation from everyone. Depending on your objectives and the con tents of the tin, children may be invited to hold the tin, shake it, and predict the contents. Depending on the children, the eventual opening of the tin may be dramatic. Depending on the children, you might want to offer peeks at this point, inviting children to keep the secret.

 

Song :                       Bears Eat Fish

Source:                                     Sue Trainor, original

A few suggested objectives:        Singing voice, Matching Pitch, healthy eating, cognitive development, self-regulation, dramatic play, locomotor movement

 Role Play: The leader says: "Let's pretend to be bears!Will our bears be big or small? Big? Ok, let me see your big bear arms. (Comment on what individual children are doing.) Show me your big bear legs. (Comment on what children are doing.). My bear is hungry! How about yours?"

Melody: Within a few repetitions, children will join the singing of this song, so it’s important to sing in “head voice.”

Steady Beat: Because we’re pretending to be big bears, the speed of the song is moderate to slow, with heavy emphasis on each word: “Bears    eat     fish.”  (Note that there is a rest in the lyrics – there are 4 beats in each line, but only three words – tap the 4th beat in order to keep steady beat.) 

 

Sing:

E         D     C
Bears eat fish
E         D     C
Bears eat fish
      F       F   G   A  G
    When I am hungry
     E          E       F  G
     That's what I wish
E          D   C
Bears eat fish

Still pretending to be bears, children go out around the room to find fish-shaped props and bring them back.to the meeting area, while we sing:  “Bears catch fish….”

Children place their fish on a cookie sheet, which we pretend to put in the oven. Sing:  “Bears cook fish….”
 
 Make a "ding" sound like a kitchen timer and take the fish out of the "oven."  Each child takes a fish and pretends to eat. Sing:   “Bears eat fish….”
 Take off our pretend bear costumes and collect the fish props.

Recall details about our experience, such as Where did you catch the fish? What color fish did you catch? Did your bear like to eat the fish?

 

I HAVE A BOX (Chant)

Collected and adapted from Katherine Lyons, Wolf Trap Master Teaching Artist

Objective: Transition to new subject, content

Put something in the box that is featured in the day's lesson.

 

I have a box

The box has a top

Let's oooooopen it up  (open slowly)

And .... Stop! (Shut the box dramatically)

 

3-Drawer Extension

I use the first drawer as clue to our discussion; it draws prior knowledge and asks children to predict.

The second drawer is always "Word of the Day."

The third drawer relates to the first two and transitions into the activity.

The example I offered was 1) a picture of a turtle, 2) the word "slow" and 3) a ball.

 

I have a box

The box has a drawer

Let's puuuuulll....

And push!

ECP Special Needs Workshop - April 19, 2015

Hi, all! Here are the music experiences from our workshop. I realized after you left and I was setting up for the afternoon that the handouts you all took were for the afternoon session (Great Musical Adaptations). That material also is relevant to our discussions, but I'm including the handout for special needs here as well:

https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/104144294/Making_Music_Special_Needs_Trainor%20copy.pdf

Here are the music experiences:

 

Hello My Friends

By Sue Trainor

Procedure:

1. Sing the song:

C    G    F    E

Hello, my friends     (Echo)

C        G     F    E

How do you do?      (Echo)

C        E         F           G

I’m happy, happy, happy  (Echo)

 E    D    E      C

To be with you!   (Echo)

 

How could we adapt this to use senses more?

Visual: Use a greeting icon, take turns singing and have icons for girls/boys/teachers/children/wearing red….

Aural: Song

Movement: create movements for each line

Tactile: (I haven’t added anything to this)

Imagination: Could be sung to greet props (if you’re using a puppet for example), or it could be part of a storytelling role play as characters are introduced.

 

Give Me the Beat

Chant by Yvette Holt

1.     Set up: Leader taps knees in steady beat.  Everyone taps knees in steady beat.

  1. Leader chants: 

Give me the beat, beat, beat

Give me the beat, beat, beat

Give me the beat, give me the beat

Give me the beat, beat, beat

 

  1. Repeat; everyone joins the chant
  2. Change motion to clapping hands. Everyone chants.

Clap your hands, hands, hands

Clap your hands, hands, hands

Clap your hands, clap your hands

Clap your hands, hands, hands

 

  1. Change motion to tapping the head. Everyone chants.

Touch your head, head, head

Touch your head, head, head

Touch your head, touch your head

Touch your head, head, head

 

6. Use other parts of the body.

 

How could we adapt this to use senses more?

Visual: Leader’s model, icons of possible choices, leader chair icon, photos of students to choose from in picking next leader

Aural: Chant, leader’s cues and spoken choices (use children’s devices as appropriate)

Movement: Beat movement, change from sitting to standing position, change to bigger movements (jump, twist, punch, stomp), move through space (walk, tiptoe, gallop)

Tactile: Feeling of the beat, teddy bear (to designate the leader), everyone has a doll or a stuffed animal to keep the beat on

Imagination: Pat the baby, rock the baby, bounce the baby, jump the baby

 

Slide Whistle

Sequence by Sue Trainor

 

Procedure:

1.  Leader demonstrates the slide whistle. 

2. Everyone pretends to play a slide whistle. Pretend to hold the whistle and imitate the sound of the slide whistle vocally. (Discuss why the slide whistle is an instrument we can’t share.)

3. Everyone imitates the sound of the slide whistle and shows the high and low movement with their hands  Play low to high pitch, until everyone makes the connection between the vocal and physical representations.

4.  Play high to low; everyone imitates the sound vocally and shows the movement of the sound with their hands.

5. Play a sound; ask children if it is low or high. Ask them to show you with their hands and sing the answer in their voices. Repeat, alternating high and low.

6. Follow the sound with other parts of the body (not vocally). Elbows, head, feet, whole body, etc. Stop moving when the sound stops. Move quickly when the pitch changes quickly and slowly when the pitch changes slowly.

 

How can we adapt this to use senses more?

Visual: We see the manipulation of the whistle, we see how others move.  Other visuals. Leader should model the movements at first, but then stop so children have to move from listening and not from watching. Take a video of children so they can see themselves moving. Move in front of a mirror. Play with mirror movement: children face each other and move together to the whistle sound.

Aural: The sound of the slide whistle (or our voices) is the focus. NOTE: if children have sound sensitivity, this strategy should be used with a mellower, metal whistle rather than a plastic one.

Movement: Move to the sound of the whistle. Use a variety of body parts: hand, elbow, head, shoulder, knee, foot, whole body. Use the whistle to walk through general space: toot the whistle in steady beat as children take one step for each toot. If the pitch changes, children crouch as they walk or walk taller.

Tactile: Move an object to the sound of the whistle.

Imagination: Use slide whistle as accompaniment to movement in a role play.

 

Hand-Hand Chant

By Sue Trainor

As the leader chants, voice pitch should climb higher and higher, then slide slowly from high to low on “down.”

Hand, hand

Reach, reach

Up, up, up, up

Down!

 

How could we adapt this to use senses more?

Because this is a simple strategy, designed for developmentally young children, I recommend keeping it just this simple. Use hand over hand support as needed.

 

Have You Got Your Spot

By Sue Trainor

1.  Everyone is sitting on a designated spot. Leader calls; children respond.

Call: Can you sit on your spot ?   Response: Yes I can!

Call: Can you sit on your spot ?   Response: Yes I can!

Call: What are you doing?          Response: Sitting on the spot

Call: What are you doing?          Response: Sitting on the spot

 

Call: Can you clap on your spot ?   Response: Yes I can!  (clap in steady beat)

Call: Can you clap on your spot ?   Response: Yes I can!  (clap in steady beat)

Call: What are you doing?          Response: Clapping on the spot

Call: What are you doing?          Response: Clapping on the spot

 

2. Try another sitting motion or two. If everyone is holding their spot, try standing.

Call: Can you stand on your spot ?   Response: Yes I can!  (etc.)

 

3.  Call: Can you jump on your spot?   Response: Yes I can!  (etc.)

4. Ask for children’s suggestions for movement and substitute those actions into the chant.

5. End with:  Call: “Can You Sit on Your Spot”   Response: Yes I can!  (etc.)

 

How could we adapt this to use senses more?

Visual: Leader’s model, could use picture icons as appropriate for leader to choose the next movement. Another visual component of this is judging one’s own self-space. Can I see that I am in my place?

Aural: Chant.

Movement: Movement in self-space as described. Movement also can be extended to other positional concepts – stand in front, beside, behind, next to, under… Spots could be self-space in the context of a larger game  – like musical chairs

Tactile: Can use spots with a prop or stuffed animal. Is the monkey on the spot? Clean-up – I often ask children to put the spot on some part of their body (head, shoulder, elbow…) and pick up the spots from there.

Imagination: Spots could be self-space in a storytelling sequence; for example, as the character’s “house” or safe space.

 

Here’s What I Learned Chant

By Sue Trainor

Here’s what I learned, oh yeah

Here’s what I learned, oh yeah

Here’s what I learned in our lesson today

Here’s what I learned, oh yeah

Here’s what I learned, oh yeah

Here’s what I learned in our lesson today

 

How could we adapt this to use senses more?

Aural: Chant

Visual: Leader motions, icons for lesson concepts or segments

Movement: Create movements to go with it. I roll my arms and tap my knees

Tactile: Feel of the beat

Imagination: Recall of what we’ve done

 

Shake Those Eggs

By Val Carroll

  1. Transition: Hand one egg to each child, singing a transition song  such as (to “Skip to My Lou”) – “Here’s an egg for you and you, here’s an egg for you and you….”
  1. Slowly sing the song and model the motions described. Give children time to imitate.  Note the “C*” means C above middle C.

 

G          G          E     E      G       G         C*

Shake those eggs and shake them high

 F          F         F         F     A       G        D

Shake those eggs and shake them low

G          G          E     E      G       G        C*

Shake those eggs and shake them high

D            F     E            D    C        E   C   

Round and round and round we go

 

(same melody)

Shake and shake and shake and stop (3x)

Then we’ll shake and shake some more

 

How could we adapt this to use senses more?

Visual: We see the leader’s model, we could use a song icon

Aural: The song, the sound of the shakers

Movement: Moving with the shakers. We could add other movements and spatial directions. (also, see tactile)

Tactile: The feeling of the shaker and the sensation of the movement inside the shaker. Could substitute other instruments (tap that drum and tap it fast, tap that drum and tap it slow….) or things like scarves.

Imagination: Could be adapted into storytelling. We could be retelling “Giraffes Can’t Dance,” for example:

Giraffes in the circle now, dance up high

Giraffes in the circle now, dance down low

Giraffes in the circle now, dance up high

Now round and round and round you go

Dance and dance and dance and stop (3x)

Then the giraffes go sit back down.

 

Walking Through the Forest 

 C     C     C    D    E  G   D   G   E   C

Walking through the forest, forest, forest

C    C     C      D   E  G

Walking through the forest

D      D  G  C

What do I see?

(chant) Sh sh sh, I think I see a ____  (Make sound effect and/or motion)

D     G  G   C

Come follow me!

 

How could we adapt this to use senses more?

Visual: Show a picture of a forest, show pictures of things we see in the forest, animal props

Aural:  song, animal sounds, recorded forest sounds

Movement: walk around the room

Tactile: Use animal props, costumes, toy cameras or binoculars

Imagination:  Imagine that we have on hiking outfits; imagine we have cameras or binoculars; imagine that some children are (in the role of) animals

 

Adaptation: This song can be adapted for any purpose involving moving through general space.

-Walking through the park, the hallway, to the bathroom, etc.

-Swimming through the ocean

-Walking to the market / walking to our seats

 

Funky Duck Chant

By Sue Trainor

 

I’m Funky Duck, hey hey

I’m Funky Duck, hey hey

I want to know

Can you find my ___ today

 

How could we adapt this to use senses more?

Visual:  Puppet duck (or other animal) to which Velcro will stick. The puppet is the visual to draw children’s attention to learning content, such as colors, shapes, letters. numbers, etc.

Aural:  the chant

Movement: Because children are being asked to focus on an object, movement is not part of this strategy, aside from the puppet moving from child to child.

Tactile: the child is asked to take a picture or shape from the duck and replace it.

Imagination: when children have learned the strategy, they can take the role of Funky Duck and take leadership with the puppet.

 

AWA ATU

Traditional, from Ghana. Awa means ‘I’m glad we have this time together’ and Atu means ‘hug’.

 

Awa, awa, awa  (D G, D G, D G) 

Atu atu atu   (A B, A B, A B)

Awa-aa-aa-aa   (BCA A-A-A)

Atu-uu-uu-uu   (ABG G-G-G)

 

HOLD IT!

Adaptation of an experience developed by Wolf Trap Master Teaching Artist Roberta Lucas

 

This is a Cumulative Song: each verse repeats exactly, but adds new words onto what came before. This also is an Echo Song: Leader sings or calls out each, and participants echo back.

 

1.

Leader: Wake up toes it's time to dance (make a toe motion)

Leader: Time to jump and time to prance (add jump, and "prance" motion) 

Leader: Hold it!   (hold hands out in “stop” pose)

Leader: Hands UP  (raise arms)

Leader: Chi-chi cha-cha chi-chi cha-cha Go-Go-Go!  (make a wiggley motion with hands still raised in the air) 

 

2. Repeat the song, and after Hands UP (echo) add  feet apart! (echo) then do chi-chi… refrain.

 

3. Repeat -- do Hands UP (echo), feet apart (echo), add knees bent (echo) , chi-chi…. Refrain.

 

Others to add:

-- knees together

-- bottoms out

-- heads up

-- tongues out

 

Here's the song our participants taught us! Remember, the melody begins like the playground chant "nyah nyah". :-)

Old shoes, new shoes

____ has on _____ shoes

1   2   3   4

Tippy-toe across the floor

Baltimore Special Needs PPT - April 19, 2015

Here's the power point for the special needs workshop with myself and Morgan Lyons.

https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/104144294/PPT%20No%20Video.pptx

There are no videos in this version of the power point. Here are some videos individually so the downloads aren't so big. These files are not necessarily the same as in the power point, but you'll be able to learn the songs from them:

"Time to Sing"  https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/104144294/Time%20to%20Sing%20copy.mp4

"Hand, Hand"  https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/104144294/2013-07-01%20stretch%20copy.mp4

"Give Me the Beat"  https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/104144294/Give%20Me%20the%20Beat%20copy%202.mp4

"Shake and Stop:  https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/104144294/Shake%20and%20Stop%20copy.mp4

"I Have a Box"  https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/104144294/2013-07-01%20box%20copy.mp4

"Senses" song with box   https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/104144294/2013-07-01%20senses%20copy.mp4

Baltimore Special Needs Handout - April 16, 2015

Here's the hand out for the special needs workshop. Note that this work is under the auspices of the Wolf Trap Institute for Early Learning through the arts. Visit their website at education.wolftrap.org for lots more great info on early childhood arts integration strategies.

Here's the handout: https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/104144294/Making_Music_Special_Needs_Trainor%20copy.pdf

BCCCRC Keynote - March 6, 2015

Hello, Friends!

Here's the power point to the Baltimore City Child Care Resource Center conference keynote, 3/7/15.

Hope it's helpful. Stay in touch!

https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/104144294/Great%20Adaptations%202hr%20keynote%20formatted%20copy.ppt

Pensacola Special Needs Workshop - February 20, 2015

Thanks so much for joining me in this workshop "Making Music with Children Who Have Special Needs." Here is the workshop repertoire - hope you find it useful. Stay in touch - let me know how it goes for you!

 

Hello My Friends

By Sue Trainor

Procedure:

1. Sing the song:

C    G    F    E

Hello, my friends     (Echo)

C        G     F    E

How do you do?      (Echo)

C        E         F           G

I’m happy, happy, happy  (Echo)

 E    D    E      C

To be with you!   (Echo)

 

How could we adapt this to use senses more?

Visual: Use a greeting icon, take turns singing and have icons for girls/boys/teachers/children/wearing red….

Aural: Song

Movement: create movements for each line

Tactile: (I haven’t added anything to this)

Imagination: Could be sung to greet props (if you’re using a puppet for example), or it could be part of a storytelling role play as characters are introduced.

 

Give Me the Beat

Chant by Yvette Holt

1.     Set up: Leader taps knees in steady beat.  Everyone taps knees in steady beat.

  1. Leader chants: 

Give me the beat, beat, beat

Give me the beat, beat, beat

Give me the beat, give me the beat

Give me the beat, beat, beat

 

  1. Repeat; everyone joins the chant
  2. Change motion to clapping hands. Everyone chants.

Clap your hands, hands, hands

Clap your hands, hands, hands

Clap your hands, clap your hands

Clap your hands, hands, hands

 

  1. Change motion to tapping the head. Everyone chants.

Touch your head, head, head

Touch your head, head, head

Touch your head, touch your head

Touch your head, head, head

 

6. Use other parts of the body.

 

How could we adapt this to use senses more?

Visual: Leader’s model, icons of possible choices, leader chair icon, photos of students to choose from in picking next leader

Aural: Chant, leader’s cues and spoken choices (use children’s devices as appropriate)

Movement: Beat movement, change from sitting to standing position, change to bigger movements (jump, twist, punch, stomp), move through space (walk, tiptoe, gallop)

Tactile: Feeling of the beat, teddy bear (to designate the leader), everyone has a doll or a stuffed animal to keep the beat on

Imagination: Pat the baby, rock the baby, bounce the baby, jump the baby

 

Slide Whistle

Sequence by Sue Trainor

 

Procedure:

1.  Leader demonstrates the slide whistle. 

2. Everyone pretends to play a slide whistle. Pretend to hold the whistle and imitate the sound of the slide whistle vocally. (Discuss why the slide whistle is an instrument we can’t share.)

3. Everyone imitates the sound of the slide whistle and shows the high and low movement with their hands  Play low to high pitch, until everyone makes the connection between the vocal and physical representations.

4.  Play high to low; everyone imitates the sound vocally and shows the movement of the sound with their hands.

5. Play a sound; ask children if it is low or high. Ask them to show you with their hands and sing the answer in their voices. Repeat, alternating high and low.

6. Follow the sound with other parts of the body (not vocally). Elbows, head, feet, whole body, etc. Stop moving when the sound stops. Move quickly when the pitch changes quickly and slowly when the pitch changes slowly.

 

How can we adapt this to use senses more?

Visual: We see the manipulation of the whistle, we see how others move.  Other visuals. Leader should model the movements at first, but then stop so children have to move from listening and not from watching. Take a video of children so they can see themselves moving. Move in front of a mirror. Play with mirror movement: children face each other and move together to the whistle sound.

Aural: The sound of the slide whistle (or our voices) is the focus. NOTE: if children have sound sensitivity, this strategy should be used with a mellower, metal whistle rather than a plastic one.

Movement: Move to the sound of the whistle. Use a variety of body parts: hand, elbow, head, shoulder, knee, foot, whole body. Use the whistle to walk through general space: toot the whistle in steady beat as children take one step for each toot. If the pitch changes, children crouch as they walk or walk taller.

Tactile: Move an object to the sound of the whistle.

Imagination: Use slide whistle as accompaniment to movement in a role play.

 

Hand-Hand Chant

By Sue Trainor

As the leader chants, voice pitch should climb higher and higher, then slide slowly from high to low on “down.”

Hand, hand

Reach, reach

Up, up, up, up

Down!

 

How could we adapt this to use senses more?

Because this is a simple strategy, designed for developmentally young children, I recommend keeping it just this simple. Use hand over hand support as needed.

 

Have You Got Your Spot

By Sue Trainor

1.  Everyone is sitting on a designated spot. Leader calls; children respond.

Call: Can you sit on your spot ?   Response: Yes I can!

Call: Can you sit on your spot ?   Response: Yes I can!

Call: What are you doing?          Response: Sitting on the spot

Call: What are you doing?          Response: Sitting on the spot

 

Call: Can you clap on your spot ?   Response: Yes I can!  (clap in steady beat)

Call: Can you clap on your spot ?   Response: Yes I can!  (clap in steady beat)

Call: What are you doing?          Response: Clapping on the spot

Call: What are you doing?          Response: Clapping on the spot

 

2. Try another sitting motion or two. If everyone is holding their spot, try standing.

Call: Can you stand on your spot ?   Response: Yes I can!  (etc.)

 

3.  Call: Can you jump on your spot?   Response: Yes I can!  (etc.)

4. Ask for children’s suggestions for movement and substitute those actions into the chant.

5. End with:  Call: “Can You Sit on Your Spot”   Response: Yes I can!  (etc.)

 

How could we adapt this to use senses more?

Visual: Leader’s model, could use picture icons as appropriate for leader to choose the next movement. Another visual component of this is judging one’s own self-space. Can I see that I am in my place?

Aural: Chant.

Movement: Movement in self-space as described. Movement also can be extended to other positional concepts – stand in front, beside, behind, next to, under… Spots could be self-space in the context of a larger game  – like musical chairs

Tactile: Can use spots with a prop or stuffed animal. Is the monkey on the spot? Clean-up – I often ask children to put the spot on some part of their body (head, shoulder, elbow…) and pick up the spots from there.

Imagination: Spots could be self-space in a storytelling sequence; for example, as the character’s “house” or safe space.

 

Here’s What I Learned Chant

By Sue Trainor

Here’s what I learned, oh yeah

Here’s what I learned, oh yeah

Here’s what I learned in our lesson today

Here’s what I learned, oh yeah

Here’s what I learned, oh yeah

Here’s what I learned in our lesson today

 

How could we adapt this to use senses more?

Aural: Chant

Visual: Leader motions, icons for lesson concepts or segments

Movement: Create movements to go with it. I roll my arms and tap my knees

Tactile: Feel of the beat

Imagination: Recall of what we’ve done

 

Shake Those Eggs

By Val Carroll

  1. Transition: Hand one egg to each child, singing a transition song  such as (to “Skip to My Lou”) – “Here’s an egg for you and you, here’s an egg for you and you….”
  1. Slowly sing the song and model the motions described. Give children time to imitate.  Note the “C*” means C above middle C.

 

G          G          E     E      G       G         C*

Shake those eggs and shake them high

 F          F         F         F     A       G        D

Shake those eggs and shake them low

G          G          E     E      G       G        C*

Shake those eggs and shake them high

D            F     E            D    C        E   C   

Round and round and round we go

 

(same melody)

Shake and shake and shake and stop (3x)

Then we’ll shake and shake some more

 

How could we adapt this to use senses more?

Visual: We see the leader’s model, we could use a song icon

Aural: The song, the sound of the shakers

Movement: Moving with the shakers. We could add other movements and spatial directions. (also, see tactile)

Tactile: The feeling of the shaker and the sensation of the movement inside the shaker. Could substitute other instruments (tap that drum and tap it fast, tap that drum and tap it slow….) or things like scarves.

Imagination: Could be adapted into storytelling. We could be retelling “Giraffes Can’t Dance,” for example:

Giraffes in the circle now, dance up high

Giraffes in the circle now, dance down low

Giraffes in the circle now, dance up high

Now round and round and round you go

Dance and dance and dance and stop (3x)

Then the giraffes go sit back down.

 

Walking Through the Forest 

 C     C     C    D    E  G   D   G   E   C

Walking through the forest, forest, forest

C    C     C      D   E  G

Walking through the forest

D      D  G  C

What do I see?

(chant) Sh sh sh, I think I see a ____  (Make sound effect and/or motion)

D     G  G   C

Come follow me! 

 

How could we adapt this to use senses more?

Visual: Show a picture of a forest, show pictures of things we see in the forest, animal props

Aural:  song, animal sounds, recorded forest sounds

Movement: walk around the room

Tactile: Use animal props, costumes, toy cameras or binoculars

Imagination:  Imagine that we have on hiking outfits; imagine we have cameras or binoculars; imagine that some children are (in the role of) animals

 

Adaptation: This song can be adapted for any purpose involving moving through general space.

-Walking through the park, the hallway, to the bathroom, etc.

-Swimming through the ocean

-Walking to the market / walking to our seats

 

Funky Duck Chant

By Sue Trainor

 

I’m Funky Duck, hey hey

I’m Funky Duck, hey hey

I want to know

Can you find my ___ today

 

How could we adapt this to use senses more?

Visual:  Puppet duck (or other animal) to which Velcro will stick. The puppet is the visual to draw children’s attention to learning content, such as colors, shapes, letters. numbers, etc.

Aural:  the chant

Movement: Because children are being asked to focus on an object, movement is not part of this strategy, aside from the puppet moving from child to child.

Tactile: the child is asked to take a picture or shape from the duck and replace it.

Imagination: when children have learned the strategy, they can take the role of Funky Duck and take leadership with the puppet.

Kinhaven School - November 4, 2014

Great to work with you all this morning!! Here are the words to the songs we used. Please be in touch if you have any questions. Best wishes for your wonderful song strategies!

 

Song :                       AGOO AME

Source:                     Traditional, from Ghana.  Collected from Kofi Dennis.

A few suggested objectives:        Steady beat, Call and response  - Taking turns, following routines

Large/small muscle movement and coordination, Auditory/Visual attention

 

1.  Set-up:  Say, in beat:  I sing "Agoo" -- You sing "Amee"

               G   E                                   G   E

2.  Sing "Agoo" -- children respond "a-me"

3. Repeat

4. Say: I go first, then you go

  Clap clap clap clap (children echo)

  Clap clap clap clap (children echo)

  Clap clap clap clap (children echo)

  hoo hoo woo hoo (children echo)

  hooo-ey! (Children echo)

 

Sing "Agoo" -- children respond "ame"

Sing "Agoo" -- children respond "ame"

Say: I go first, then you go:

  Shoulder shoulder shoulder shoulder (children echo)

  Shoulder shoulder shoulder shoulder (children echo)

  Shoulder shoulder shoulder shoulder (children echo)

  hoo hoo woo hoo (children echo)

  hooo-ey! (Children echo)

 

Sing "Agoo" -- children respond "amee"

Sing "Agoo" -- children respond "amee”

Say: I go first, then you go:

  Side side side side (children echo)

  Side side side side (children echo)

  Side side side side (children echo)

    hoo hoo woo hoo (children echo)

  hooo-ey! (Children echo)

 

Sing "Agoo" -- children respond "amee"

Sing "Agoo" -- children respond "amee”

Say: I go first, then you go:

  Clap clap clap clap (children echo)

  Shoulder shoulder shoulder shoulder (children echo)

  Side side side side (children echo)

  hoo hoo woo hoo (children echo)

  hooo-ey! (Children echo)

 

 

Extensions:

·       Try other motions, such as stretch up (climbing motions), stretch down,

fly, hop, jump, twist, etc. Always include the “hoo hoo hoo” and “Hoooey!”

·       Invite children to choose motions, from a list (visual or written) or from their imaginations.

·       Invite children to lead motions, either selected by the teacher or motions they’ve chosen.

 

 

Song :                       GIVE ME THE BEAT

Source:                                     By Yvette Holt

A few suggested objectives:        Steady beat, Body part identification, Action words

 

 

1.     Set up: Leader taps knees in steady beat.  Everyone taps knees in steady beat.

2.     Leader chants:

Give me the beat, beat, beat

Give me the beat, beat, beat

Give me the beat, give me the beat

Give me the beat, beat, beat

 

3.     Repeat; everyone joins the chant

4.     Change motion to clapping hands. Everyone chants.

Clap your hands, hands, hands

Clap your hands, hands, hands

Clap your hands, clap your hands

Clap your hands, hands, hands

 

5.     Change motion to tapping the head. Everyone chants.

Touch your head, head, head

Touch your head, head, head

Touch your head, touch your head

Touch your head, head, head

 

 

Extensions:

Use other parts of the body.
Invite children to choose the next body part (from a set of pictures or from imagination).
Invite children to lead verses, either teacher selected body part or choosing the body part themselves.
Focus on action words: Clap, touch, tap, twist, jump, etc.

 

Song :                         Slide Whistle Warm-Up

Source:                                                       Sue Trainor

 

 

Objectives:                            Aural discrimination (high and low)

                                                      Following directions

                                                      Awareness of one’s body in space

                                                      Large Motor coordination

 

                   

Procedure:

1.  Leader demonstrates the slide whistle.

 

2. Everyone pretends to play a slide whistle. Pretend to hold the whistle and imitate the sound of the slide whistle vocally. (Discuss why the slide whistle is an instrument we can’t share.)

 

3. Everyone imitates the sound of the slide whistle and shows the high and low movement with their hands  Play low to high pitch, until everyone makes the connection between the vocal and physical representations.

 

4.  Play high to low; everyone imitates the sound vocally and shows the movement of the sound with their hands.

 

5. Play a sound; ask children if it is low or high. Ask them to show you with their hands and sing the answer in their voices. Repeat, alternating high and low.

 

6. Follow the sound with other parts of the body (not vocally). Elbows, head, feet, whole body, etc. Stop moving when the sound stops. Move quickly when the pitch changes quickly and slowly when the pitch changes slowly.

 

 

 

 


Song :                        Hello Toes  

Source:                                     Collected from Mary Gresock

 

 

A few suggested objectives:

                                    Singing Voice

                                    Matching Pitch

                                    Creative movement

                                    Identify Body parts, clothing, other things

 

                   

 

1. Set up the starting pitch and beat with a cue phrase like “Let’s all sing”

 

2. Sing the song. Children will join as they learn it.

 

G  G   E       G   G    G    E

Hello toes, how do you do?  (tap toes)

 

G   G     E     A    A   G     E    C

I’m just fine and I’m dancing, too  (wiggle toes and sing in a character voice)

 

G    G     G    E

Ah doo doo doo  (make the toes dance and keep singing in character voice through the rest of the song)

 

G     G     E

Doo doo doo

 

G      G    E    A   A   G   E    C

Doo doo doo do-do doo doo doo

 

Model the first few times, then invite children to choose.

Hello knees…

Hello tummy….

Hello hands….

Hello tummy…..

Hello head….

 

Extension:

·       Substitute clothing (Hello shoes, socks, pants, etc.)

·       Greet puppets or animal props. How do they move?

·       Substitute people’s names (Hello Lee… and Lee gets to answer and lead a dance motion.)

 

 

 

Song :                       The Cows Are Lost

Source:                                     Traditional

A few suggested objectives:        Singing voice, Matching Pitch, Loud/Quiet, Fast/Slow, identifying animals

 

Sung slowly and quietly:

 

G    G        G     C     G    G    G   C   G   G   G   C      G   G     G        C

The cows are lost, the sun is low, I think I'll rest, 'til they come home

 

Sung fast and more loudly:

 

G        G     G    E   C   E        G    G   F      D     G   G-F-D

Wake up you sleepy head, and go and hunt the cows,

G        G     G    E  C    E          G   G   F     D      D     C

wake up you sleepy heads, and go and hunt the cows

 

Extension:

- Repeat with other animals, for example, from "I Went Walking"

- Ask children to find the cow among other animals

- Ask children to go on a treasure hunt to find the cows in the room.


 

 

Song :                       Charlie Over the Ocean

Source:                                     Traditional

A few suggested objectives:        Singing voice, Matching Pitch, Taking turns , Identifying color,    Matching color, Awareness of one’s body in space

                   

1.  Begin with everyone sitting in a circle, facing the center.

2.  Each player has a colored fish – red, blue, yellow, green, orange, etc. Colors may repeat. The fish are on the floor where everyone can see them.

3. Decide which color fish will be sung about first.  (Depending on the age/stage of the children, this information can be a secret from Charlie until the song is sung. Silently show a color to the children in the circle while Charlie hides her eyes.)

4. One person is “Charlie” (Charlie might wear a hat or be designated in some other way) and walks around the outside of the circle while everyone sings:

F       F    F   F   F    G   A

Charlie over the ocean

F       F    F   F   F    C

Charlie over the sea

F        F    F           F   G     A

Charlie caught a red fish

F            F          F

Can’t catch me

 

5. When Charlie hears the color of the fish, she taps a person in the circle who has that color fish, and begins to walk quickly around the circle. The person tapped gets up and follows Charlie quickly.  The objective is to tap Charlie before she gets back to and sits in the empty seat.

 

6.  The chaser either taps Charlie or not. In either case, the chaser becomes Charlie in the next repetition.

 


Song :                       Bears Eat Fish

Source:                                     Sue Trainor, original

A few suggested objectives:        Singing voice, Matching Pitch, healthy eating, cognitive development, self-regulation, dramatic play, locomotor movement

 Role Play: The leader says: "Let's pretend to be bears!Will our bears be big or small? Big? Ok, let me see your big bear arms. (Comment on what individual children are doing.) Show me your big bear legs. (Comment on what children are doing.). My bear is hungry! How about yours?"

Melody: Within a few repetitions, children will join the singing of this song, so it’s important to sing in “head voice.”

Steady Beat: Because we’re pretending to be big bears, the speed of the song is moderate to slow, with heavy emphasis on each word: “Bears    eat     fish.”  (Note that there is a rest in the lyrics – there are 4 beats in each line, but only three words – tap the 4th beat in order to keep steady beat.)

 

Sing:

E         D     C
Bears eat fish
E         D     C
Bears eat fish
      F       F   G   A  G
    When I am hungry
     E          E       F  G
     That's what I wish
E          D   C
Bears eat fish

Still pretending to be bears, children go out around the room to find fish-shaped props and bring them back.to the meeting area, while we sing:  “Bears catch fish….”

Children place their fish on a cookie sheet, which we pretend to put in the oven. Sing:  “Bears cook fish….”
 
 Make a "ding" sound like a kitchen timer and take the fish out of the "oven."  Each child takes a fish and pretends to eat. Sing:   “Bears eat fish….”
 Take off our pretend bear costumes and collect the fish props.

Recall details about our experience, such as Where did you catch the fish? What color fish did you catch? Did your bear like to eat the fish?

 

 

 

That’s a Mighty Pretty Motion

 Adapted from the traditional

 

E          D  C C         C    C      C    C

That’s a mighty pretty (motion)

C     C      E

Dee di dee

E          D  C C         C    C      C    C

That’s a mighty pretty (motion)

C     C      E

Dee di dee

E          D  C C         C    C      C    C

That’s a mighty pretty (motion)

C     C      E

Dee di dee

G      F     D   C

Sing children sing

 

(or “next motion please”

Or “whose turn is next?”)


 

Here’s What I Learned, Oh Yeah

/Sue Trainor

 

 

Here’s what I learned, oh yeah

Here’s what I learned, oh yeah

Here’s what I learned in our lesson today

 

Here’s what I learned, oh yeah

Here’s what I learned, oh yeah

Here’s what I learned in our lesson today

 

STEAM MAKES YOUR LESSONS GO FURTHER - September 13, 2014

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