Arlington 8/31/16

Hello, Friends! Great session this morning! Thanks so much for all your energy and participation (and patience with that small, crowded room!). Here are the strategies from our workshop today. Please stay in touch and let me know how things go for you, and if you have any questions as you try things out, I'm happy to continue the conversation. And don't forget to go to education.wolftrap.org for video demonstrations and so many more ideas! Best wishes for an awesome year!

Give Me the Beat

Chant by Yvette Holt

1.     Set up: Leader taps knees in steady beat.  Everyone taps knees in steady beat.

2.     Leader chants:

Give me the beat, beat, beat

Give me the beat, beat, beat

Give me the beat, give me the beat

Give me the beat, beat, beat

 

3.     Repeat; everyone joins the chant

4.     Change motion to clapping hands. Everyone chants.

Clap your hands, hands, hands

Clap your hands, hands, hands

Clap your hands, clap your hands

Clap your hands, hands, hands

 

5.     Change motion to tapping the head. Everyone chants.

Touch your head, head, head

Touch your head, head, head

Touch your head, touch your head

Touch your head, head, head

 

6. Use other parts of the body.

 

How could we adapt this to use senses more?

Visual: Leader’s model, icons of possible choices, leader chair icon, photos of students to choose from in picking next leader

Aural: Chant, leader’s cues and spoken choices (use children’s devices as appropriate)

Movement: Beat movement, change from sitting to standing position, change to bigger movements (jump, twist, punch, stomp), move through space (walk, tiptoe, gallop)

Tactile: Feeling of the beat, teddy bear (to designate the leader), everyone has a doll or a stuffed animal to keep the beat on

Imagination: Pat the baby, rock the baby, bounce the baby, jump the baby



 BEAR CHAIR

Applied to  “Give Me the Beat”

 

Show toy teddy bear. “This is my friend, Bear. This is the Bear Chair.” Attach photo of the bear to a chair in the front of the room. “Whoever has Bear is the leader and gets to sit in the Bear Chair.”

 

Model first, then pass the bear to individual children. Offer children a choice of body parts to tap; use pictoral icons as appropriate.

 

Slide Whistle

Sequence by Sue Trainor

 

Procedure:

1.  Leader demonstrates the slide whistle.

 

2. Everyone pretends to play a slide whistle. Pretend to hold the whistle and imitate the sound of the slide whistle vocally. (Discuss why the slide whistle is an instrument we can’t share.)

 

3. Everyone imitates the sound of the slide whistle and shows the high and low movement with their hands  Play low to high pitch, until everyone makes the connection between the vocal and physical representations.

 

4.  Play high to low; everyone imitates the sound vocally and shows the movement of the sound with their hands.

 

5. Play a sound; ask children if it is low or high. Ask them to show you with their hands and sing the answer in their voices. Repeat, alternating high and low.

 

6. Follow the sound with other parts of the body (not vocally). Elbows, head, feet, whole body, etc. Stop moving when the sound stops. Move quickly when the pitch changes quickly and slowly when the pitch changes slowly.

 

How can we adapt this to use senses more?

Visual: We see the manipulation of the whistle, we see how others move.  Other visuals. Leader should model the movements at first, but then stop so children have to move from listening and not from watching. Take a video of children so they can see themselves moving. Move in front of a mirror. Play with mirror movement: children face each other and move together to the whistle sound.

Aural: The sound of the slide whistle (or our voices) is the focus. NOTE: if children have sound sensitivity, this strategy should be used with a mellower, metal whistle rather than a plastic one.

Movement: Move to the sound of the whistle. Use a variety of body parts: hand, elbow, head, shoulder, knee, foot, whole body. Use the whistle to walk through general space: toot the whistle in steady beat as children take one step for each toot. If the pitch changes, children crouch as they walk or walk taller.

Tactile: Move an object to the sound of the whistle.

Imagination: Use slide whistle as accompaniment to movement in a role play.

 

Can You Sit On Your Spot

By Sue Trainor

 

1.  Everyone is sitting on a designated spot. Leader calls; children respond.

Call: Can you sit on your spot ?   Response: Yes I can!

Call: Can you sit on your spot ?   Response: Yes I can!

Call: What are you doing?          Response: Sitting on the spot

Call: What are you doing?          Response: Sitting on the spot

 

Call: Can you clap on your spot ?   Response: Yes I can!  (clap in steady beat)

Call: Can you clap on your spot ?   Response: Yes I can!  (clap in steady beat)

Call: What are you doing?          Response: Clapping on the spot

Call: What are you doing?          Response: Clapping on the spot

 

2. Try another sitting motion or two. If everyone is holding their spot, try standing.

Call: Can you stand on your spot ?   Response: Yes I can!  (etc.)

 

3.  Call: Can you jump on your spot?   Response: Yes I can!  (etc.)

4. Ask for children’s suggestions for movement and substitute those actions into the chant.

5. End with:  Call: “Can You Sit on Your Spot”   Response: Yes I can!  (etc.)

 

How could we adapt this to use senses more?

Visual: Leader’s model, could use picture icons as appropriate for leader to choose the next movement. Another visual component of this is judging one’s own self-space. Can I see that I am in my place?

Aural: Chant.

Movement: Movement in self-space as described. Movement also can be extended to other positional concepts – stand in front, beside, behind, next to, under… Spots could be self-space in the context of a larger game  – like musical chairs

Tactile: Can use spots with a prop or stuffed animal. Is the monkey on the spot? Clean-up – I often ask children to put the spot on some part of their body (head, shoulder, elbow…) and pick up the spots from there.

Imagination: Spots could be self-space in a storytelling sequence; for example, as the character’s “house” or safe space.

 

Walking Through the Forest

 

 C     C     C    D    E  G   D   G   E   C

Walking through the forest, forest, forest

C    C     C      D   E  G

Walking through the forest

D      D  G  C

What do I see?

(chant) Sh sh sh, I think I see a ____  (Make sound effect and/or motion)

D     G  G   C

Come follow me!

 

How could we adapt this to use senses more?

Visual: Show a picture of a forest, show pictures of things we see in the forest, animal props

Aural:  song, animal sounds, recorded forest sounds

Movement: walk around the room

Tactile: Use animal props, costumes, toy cameras or binoculars

Imagination:  Imagine that we have on hiking outfits; imagine we have cameras or binoculars; imagine that some children are (in the role of) animals

 

Adaptation: This song can be adapted for any purpose involving moving through general space.

-Walking through the park, the hallway, to the bathroom, etc.

-Swimming through the ocean

-Walking to the market / walking to our seats

 

 

Funky Duck Chant

By Sue Trainor

 

I’m Funky Duck, hey hey

I’m Funky Duck, hey hey

I want to know

Can you find my ___ today

 

How could we adapt this to use senses more?

Visual:  Puppet duck (or other animal) to which Velcro will stick. The puppet is the visual to draw children’s attention to learning content, such as colors, shapes, letters. numbers, etc.

Aural:  the chant

Movement: Because children are being asked to focus on an object, movement is not part of this strategy, aside from the puppet moving from child to child.

Tactile: the child is asked to take a picture or shape from the duck and replace it.

Imagination: when children have learned the strategy, they can take the role of Funky Duck and take leadership with the puppet.


I Have a Box

Adapted from Katherine Lyons, WT Master Teaching Artist

Chant, in steady beat:

I have a box,

The box has a top

Let’s oooooooopen it

And    STOP!     (Shut the box quickly, with a bang or more gently)

After several repetitions:

 Let’s oooooopen it    (voice slides from down to up pitch)

 And see what we’ve got!


 

When the activity that emerges from the box is complete and props are returned to the box:

 Let’s clooooooooose it (voice slides from up to down pitch)

And stop.



Imagination Box: Use your fist for the box. Take the box from behind your back and use your other hand as the top.   

After doing the opening ritual, say:

“I see a ____ moving about”

Let’s reach inside and take the ____ out.”

Note that you can take out whatever you choose; one example is taking out only the lion’s voice, and shutting the box to end the sound.



Imaginary Journey (drama strategy):  Carry your imaginary backpack on your journey! What goes inside? Draw an imaginary refrigerator and open it to find drinks and snacks. Maybe you have binoculars under your chair, and sunglasses in your pocket. As you take the journey, don’t forget to use what you’ve brought. Stop and role play the snack time, using the binoculars, etc.



 AWA

Traditional, from Ghana. Awa means ‘I’m glad we have this time together’ and Atu means ‘hug’.

 

Awa, awa, awa  (D G, D G, D G)

Atu atu atu   (A B, A B, A B)

Awa-aa-aa-aa   (BCA A-A-A)

Atu-uu-uu-uu   (ABG G-G-G)

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