Mo. Co. Preschool

Hey, Friends! Here are the Initial Sound and Rhyme strategies I shared today. Hope you find them to be helpful models!

Best regards, Sue

 

INITIAL SOUND AWARENESS

Adaptations by Sue Trainor

 

1) Try using your favorite rap and hip hop rhythms to practice initial letter sounds. Here’s a simple 4-beat count (1 2 3 4). Show visuals of the letter “C”  and the ending sound “at.”

 

C  -  at    (clap clap)

C  -  at    (clap clap)

The word  (clap clap)

Is  ___  (clap clap)

 

C  -  at    (clap clap)

C  -  at    (clap clap)

The word  (clap clap)

Is ___  (clap clap)

 

Change the first first letter and repeat.

 

When the word family changes, offer children the option of changing the movement:

 

D – og (stomp stomp)

D- og (stomp  stomp)

The word (stomp stomp)

Is ____ (stomp stomp)

 

What I would NOT do (though it’s tempting) is to add movement on the first two beats. Young children don’t have the coordination to move and vocalize at the same time (unless they already know the song really well), so adding movement in that moment distracts from the learning objective.

 

 

2) Here’s a more complex rhythm, modeled by the “Pop See Koo” video on YouTube. 

 

CALL                                        RESPONSE

Hey friends                              Uh-huh

Are you ready                         Oh yeah!

 

My hands are high

My feet are low 

“at” words, it’s time to go!

                                                My hands are high

My feet are low 

“at” words, it’s time to go!

 

ALL (show visuals of the letter “C”  and the ending sound “at”)

Think about the Pop See Coo rhythm

 

C – at

C C   C -at

C – at

C C C – cat!

 

As above, repeat the song with a new first letter.  

 

 

RHYMING

 

Here’s a chant for a picture card exercise:

 

Now’s the Time to Make Some Rhyme

By Sue Trainor

 

Chorus:

Now’s the time

To make some rhyme

Now’s the time

To make some rhyme

 

If I say “cat"

That rhymes with ____(“hat") (offer children a visual choice of a rhyme word and a not rhyme word)

If I say “cat"

That rhymes with ___

 

Cat – hat, cat – hat

Now’s the time

To make some rhyme

Now’s the time

To make some rhyme

 

Continue with more examples for children to respond. Large group and/or individual turns.

 

 

 

Rhymes in context

Adaptations by Sue Trainor

 

I have found it helpful to animate nursery rhymes in a multi-sensory experience. For example:

 

 

Humpty Dumpty

I might begin with an imaginary box (as developed by Wolf Trap Master Teaching Artist Katherine Lyons). 

            Imaginary Box

1)    First we go into imagination (some sound cue – could be an instrument, could be a sound we make with our mouths). 

 

2)    Model: I’m going to reach behind my back and get (dramatically) my imaginary box. I bet you have one, too!.

 

3)    Chant:

I have a box

            My box has a top

            Let’s peek inside and – STOP! (shut)

 

I have a box

            My box has a top

            Let’s peek inside….  OH!

 

            I see a horse galloping about

            Let’s reach inside and take his voice out  (make horse noises)

            And…  Stop! (shut)

 

            Let’s take out his feet this time.

            Let’s peek inside and take his feet out!

            Make galloping sound (hands on lap)

            Optional: Let’s put the gallop in our feet (in our spots)

            Optional: Let’s gallop in our circle.

            Time to put our horse feet back in our box….. and STOP!

 

            Let’s put our boxes behind our backs and come back from imagination.

            (Sound cue)

 

 

 

4)    Storybox

Storybox is a container with small props that become visuals for story sequence. In this case, I would use visual word cues as well. 

 

One day, the king’s men took those horses out galloping around and can you guess what they found? (Show Humpty Dumpty broken on the ground.) Oh no! 

 

5)    What happened??

 

6)    Recite rhyme with props and rhyme word cues; depending on skill level, offer children choices that include words that rhyme but don’t fit the context, and/or words that don’t rhyme. 

 

 

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